Feb 062014
 

Below are five of the coolest lighting news items that caught our attention in January 2014, from Detroit’s big LED plans to a light-up bridge that looks like a dragon. Feeling slightly peckish? Here’s a light buffet…

1) Public Lighting Authority to install LED lamps in Detroit, cut installation period in half

 Pegasus Lighting Roundup: January 2014

via www.detroitnews.com

Detroit is redoing the public lights in all city neighborhoods. At a meeting on Wednesday, January 29, Mayor Duggan and the state-create Public Lighting Authority decided not only to use LED lamps exclusively, but also to speed up the process of relighting the city. Read more…

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 Posted by on February 6, 2014 at 12:23 pm
Jan 312014
 

You know the sound of floodlights snapping to life in a stadium. In sports movies, the sound (usually enhanced for the sake of drama) heralds the movie’s climax. That final showdown. If the movie is any good, you really don’t know what’s going to happen, who’s going to win. It’s the sound of our attention being completely drawn into the drama before us. Floodlights symbolize our full engagement with the spectacle before us. Any of life’s quotidian stresses that may have bothered us before this showdown are forgotten.

10 5 Things You Didnt Know About Stadium Lighting

via picaboo.com

Even when glimpsed from the highway for a split second, stadium lights engage our imaginations. The fact that we would construct such colossal, expensive contraptions in order to get lost in the drama of competition and spectacle is, actually, pretty heart-warming. In society, there are so many things that superficially divide us: Nothing brings us all back together like a football stadium on a Friday night. To see this emblem of our shared love of drama, our helplessness against the tendency to hope and dream and aspire despite our practical sides, on such a large scale is always cool to me.

So, in honor of the magic of giant stadiums and the way their giant lights capture our imaginations, here are five things about stadium lights I bet you didn’t know.

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 Posted by on January 31, 2014 at 10:00 am
Jan 282014
 

Welcome to Amateur Hour, folks! A couple weeks ago, I conducted and shared an interview with Austin, TX photographer Matthew Danser about how he “paints with light.” At the end of that interview, I promised you, dear readers, that I would try to replicate Danser’s technique at home without professional equipment. It felt good to make that promise. Until the next day. Gulp.

DSC 0147 Painting with Light: Amateur Edition

Imitating the pros. Trying to paint with light. Matthew Danser is going to kill me when he sees that I have massacred his beautiful photograph and created this emblem of the amateur imitating the professional. Danser’s work can be seen at www.matthewdanserphotography.com.

I have a great deal of interest in digital photography, but my life is as crazy as anyone else’s. My son, family, and work keep me busy from dawn to midnight every day. I’ve never had time to cultivate any photography skills, even though I’ve always been very interested, sitting on the edge of my seat, if you will, for a chance to take some digital photos in order to learn a little about how capturing light can create astonishing works of art.

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Jan 232014
 

This year, Pegasus Lighting is celebrating its 15th anniversary, and to commemorate we will be posting articles every month about what was going on – you know, in terms of pop culture – in 1999. Just so we don’t forget where we came from.

Here are 15 things you might remember from 15 years ago.

1) Impeachment Trial of President Bill Clinton Begins in the Senate

A tense moment in U.S. history, Bill Clinton’s Senate impeachment trial began in January 1999. Clinton had been impeached by the House of Representatives on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice. It was only the second time in history that the House had impeached The President of the United States. The Senate trial, however, would end in acquittal.

Bill Clinton 15 Pop Culture Moments from January 1999

Sure, there were a lot of interesting things about the game itself, but the commercials are what really bring us back to the 1990s. The Broncos won for the second time in a row. Depending on your football affiliations, this could be an omen or a prophecy for the game coming up soon. Also noteworthy is that in 1999 John Elway was the oldest NFL player to be named Super Bowl MVP.

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 Posted by on January 23, 2014 at 1:44 pm
Jan 152014
 

When you step to the edge of the Grand Canyon, or take a gondola across Niagara Falls, or look over any natural abyss or up any colossal structure, well, there’s a certain thing that happens. Invoking Keanu Reeves and Joey Lawrence at once — an admirable feat itself — I call this feeling the whoa moment.

It’s that weightless feeling we get when we walk into a huge cathedral or behold a haunting religious painting or painted sarcophagus, things that make us say, Whoa! Seriously. Is this fo’ real?

 The Science of Whoa

Yesterday morning, on the front cover of its morning edition, The New York Times published a photo of a 1,500-year-old Buddhist relic held in the National Museum of Afghanistan, a museum that was devastated by the Taliban in 2001. One can only imagine how it must feel to behold this relic in person, to breathe the air of it. Its age, its spiritual significance, its stunning composition, its serenity, and even the story of the danger it survived in 2001, all help create an aura around the object. The thing has gravitas. Continue reading »

 Posted by on January 15, 2014 at 10:00 am
Jan 102014
 
Danser January2014 How to Paint with Light

via www.matthewdanserphotography.com

Recently I interviewed Austin, TX photographer Matthew Danser about some innovative ways he uses light in his digital photos.

For the photo shown to the right, taken at night in a Texas ghost town, Danser assembled the following items: a powerful, handheld LED light; his Canon 5D Mark iii camera and Canon 16-35 mm L lens (at 16mm); Canon 580ex 2 flash; a red gel (piece of red cellophane to color the light of the flash); a tripod; and his girlfriend’s finger (to graciously hold down the shutter release button because he forgot his bulb release at home!).

Danser told Pegasus: “So, I set my camera on bulb mode and had my girlfriend hold down the shutter release button for 13 minutes, while the camera was very sturdy on the tripod. The place was pitch black except for the stars and the moon (very little ambient light pollution in the desert). As my girlfriend was keeping the shutter open, I walked to one side of the structure and methodically shined my flashlight (rated at 2000 lumens, so it’s pretty bright) all along the exterior and front facade of the building. This lasted for about five minutes before I turned the flashlight off and ran to the other side of the building and ‘painted’ for another five minutes.”

Danser said that one of the important tricks of light painting is to show off the textures of the buildings by shining his LED flashlight at an angle instead of from the camera position.

After “painting” the sides of the building for five minutes each, he ran inside and popped off about 10 red-gelled flashes to create the effect of a warm glow pouring out of the building.

When asked how he was able to run in and out of the building without showing up in the photo, Danser simply replied that “The camera could not ‘see’ me because I was moving quickly, and there wasn’t enough ambient light to expose me in the picture.” While popping off the gelled flashes in the building, he always made sure he was not visible to the camera. Continue reading »

Jan 082014
 

They say no two snowflakes are alike.

These incredible photos from Alexey Kljatov prove it and reveal the awesome beauty of each one:

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The crazy thing is (as if the photos aren’t mind-blowing enough!), Kljatov took these photos with an old Canon point-and-shoot camera off his balcony in Moscow. He jerry-rigged a lens to the camera and taped the entire contraption to a piece of wood so the shot would be steady.

The snowflakes landed on a glass plate and he illuminated them with an LED flashlight from the opposite side. That’s right – no fancy studio lights or umbrellas, just a simple LED flashlight. Read more about his technique or see his Flickr page for more photos.

 

Jan 022014
 

Who wouldn’t love to live with a little less clutter? There’s a reason Pinterest is overflowing with images of perfectly categorized & organized cupboards, closets, pantries, drawers, desks, garages, kitchens … the list goes on! See for yourself: organization is truly one of social media’s best friends.

Closets & pantries can fall to the wayside when it comes to organizing chaos, and the culprit is often poor lighting. Builders are notorious for installing lone overhead fluorescent fixtures that simply don’t create effective storage spaces. Here are four fresh closet lighting ideas for inspiration:

1. Track Lighting: Functional, Beautiful Spotlighting

via artistic designs for living 4 Fresh Closet Lighting Ideas

via artisticdesignsforliving.com

Continue reading »

Dec 302013
 

Light Bulb Question Mark Green Where Did the Phrase Go Green Come From?

“Going green” has come to symbolize environmentalism in such a familiar way that most of us don’t think twice about who first coined the phrase.

I was curious about the origin of the term and wondered what made it take such strong hold in the English language. Speaking of curiosities, remember Heinz’s food flop several years ago when they decided to go green (literally) with ketchup? Glad that didn’t take hold.

Most people associate the beginning of the green movement and environmentalism with the publication of Silent Spring by Rachel Carson in the 1970’s.

Surprisingly, it dates back even further, to Henry David Thoreau’s writings in the 19th century. Thoreau spoke about living a “green” life in The Maine Woods in his call for conservation, forest preservation and respect for nature. You are probably familiar with several of Thoreau’s famous inspirational quotes (i.e., “Go confidently in the direction of your dreams,” or “What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us”). His greener remarks include:

What is the use of a house if you don’t have a decent planet to put it on?

This one’s my favorite (Thoreau, you were a funny guy!):

Beware of all enterprises that require a new set of clothes.

Did you have any idea the U.S. “green movement” was rooted in early American philosophy?

 

 Posted by on December 30, 2013 at 10:01 am

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