Jan 112013
 

It’s a new year, and many of us have resolved to finally do what makes us happy. To stop coming up with reasons not to do the things we want. Of course, this time of year also brings many to the crippling realization of just how much they spent over the holidays, and how much they need to save in the new year.

Good lighting, beautiful lighting, new lighting in your home can really work miracles for the space’s look and feel, and even your own well-being. But, when trying to save money, springing for new lights can feel like too much of a luxury. How do you know when it’s worth it?

We’ve put our heads together here at Pegasus Lighting to come up with the 8 best reasons you should say YES! to a lighting upgrade:

1. You’re wasting money. 

Blue Indirect Lighting in a Kitchen

This reasoning isn’t too hard to figure out. Wasting money on old, energy-sucking lights is worse than saving money on new, energy-saving lights. There may be a little more expense upfront, but new, efficient lights will pay for themselves really quickly. If you switch just 3 of your 60-watt incandescent light bulbs for 12-watt LEDs, you’ll save about $114 every year! To compare more light sources, take a look at this infographic.

2. You have trouble seeing.

interior of modern kitchen

If your lights are inadequate, especially in areas where you have to intensely focus on tasks (kitchens, bathrooms, offices) you’re not doing yourself any favors. Eyestrain does not a happy homeowner make. Good lighting in these task areas will make it much easier to focus, and to get things right the first time. Make your work space a healthy one with task lighting essentials like under cabinet lights in the kitchen, or a good desk lamp for reading. Continue reading »

 Posted by on January 11, 2013 at 2:51 pm
Dec 062012
 

The best home décor makes a statement about you. If you’re looking to revamp your home’s interior, you can adapt simple, statement light fixtures to fit your personal style. Let’s investigate how a few different kinds of lights can complement your favorite look.

Jointed Desk Lamp

This classic light has been around for awhile, but its basic design makes it just as popular today as it was fifty years ago. Its simple yet bold design makes it just as versatile as it is fashionable. Here are several styles that work with this useful lamp:

  • Industrial homes feature exposed brick walls and building materials with few frills. A jointed lamp on a desk or table works perfectly in keeping with this deconstructed and boldly architectural style. 
  • Contemporary homes with their striking colors and futuristic furnishings can also use a jointed desk lamp. Opting for one in a contrasting tone from your bedside or workspace table will agree with the sleek lines of your modern abode.
  • Minimalist dwellings can also incorporate jointed desk lamps, because they’re incredibly simple and clean looking. Try one in the same shade as the neutral colors of your other furnishings to achieve a monochromatic look.  Continue reading »
 Posted by on December 6, 2012 at 9:08 am
Nov 212012
 

Besides just having light, light layering (having multiple light sources for different purposes) is the most important, all-encompassing rule in home lighting design.

I recently ran across a post on Freshome featuring a loft installation designed by Luiz Fernando Grabowsky. It demonstrates this essential rule with finesse, using multiple lighting fixtures to bring out every aspect of the room. I was especially impressed because it does so in such a small space, and manages to make the place look so unique.

Let me break down how and why this loft rocks my world with its light layers. But first, here’s a photo:

Image via Freshome.com

Ah, the lovely, lovely light. This space is such a great example of light layering. A single light source never does any space justice. You need different light sources for different purposes, for aesthetics and functionality. Continue reading »

 Posted by on November 21, 2012 at 12:29 pm
Oct 232012
 


Though probably the “darkest” holiday on our calendar, light is so very important to Halloween. The jack-o’ lantern (originally carved out of a turnip, by the way) only comes alive when illuminated. And when it’s close to midnight and something evil’s lurking in the dark, you need the moonlight to see that sight that almost stops your heart. (‘Cause this is thriller…)

Moving on.

If you’ve been bled dry of any creative Halloween décor ideas this October, consider using light to make a strong, spooky statement. Here are a few ideas:

1. Eyeballs on a string.

All you need for this project are some ping-pong balls, permanent markers, and Christmas lights. Just color in 2 concentric circles on the ping-pong ball in whatever colors you like. If you’re feeling especially ghoulish, you can draw red veins on them too, to make bloodshot eyes. Then poke a small hole in each ball and stick a single Christmas light through. You’ll have freaky glowing eyeballs to string across your doorway, or drape on a festive party table.

Image via LandeeSeeLandeeDo.com

Image via DollarStoreCrafts.com

2. Ghosts in the yard.

If you have handy lights lining a path or driveway at your house, this idea will take no time at all. You just need to collect a bunch of old plastic milk jugs with the tops cut off or white paper bags (I suggest making the decision after you get the weather report for All Hallows’ Eve). Simply draw eyes on the jugs/bags with a black marker, and slip them one by one over each path light. Bada-boo! You’ve got a yard full of phantoms. Continue reading »

 Posted by on October 23, 2012 at 11:40 am
Oct 222012
 


Here at Pegasus, we recently added some brand new affordable chandeliers and pendant lights to our website. So, I think now is the perfect time to give you a few tips on how to use them. Read on for practical advice and some unexpected design inspiration for using chandeliers and hanging lights…

For the Dining Room:

I’m sure I only have to type the word “dining room” to make most everyone conjure up an image of a fancy table with an opulent chandelier. Though very little thought probably went into that association, adding a chandelier to your own dining room does take some planning. Two basic rules here:

1. A chandelier should always go about 30” above the table.

2. It should also be about 6” narrower than the width of the table on each side.

If you like the traditional look of a chandelier, but have a larger space to fill, try multiple fixtures instead of one large chandelier, which might look too bulky.

For the Living Room:

For those of you with a living room and dining room in one large space, or if your den has multiple seating areas, double chandeliers will also help the space look more cohesive.

For the Kitchen:

Even though it’s one of the more “functional” rooms in the home, a chandelier can add the perfect ambiance to your kitchen, making everyday tasks feel more fanciful.

While the 30” rule is a go-to for the dining room, a chandelier over an island or open counter top should rest slightly higher, as to not block your range of movement. Continue reading »

 Posted by on October 22, 2012 at 11:29 am
Oct 182012
 

Stringing lights onto your Christmas tree can be a major nightmare. I mean, people have written songs about how terrible it is. Before the stress of the season takes over, check out our latest guest post from holiday expert Linda Knighton. These simple tips for lighting your artificial Christmas tree will help keep peace on earth throughout your holiday preparation.

If you’re new to owning an artificial Christmas tree, you may discover that it’s a little different to decorate. Although it generally takes more time to put light strands on an artificial Christmas tree, the benefit is that once you’ve placed them on the branches, you won’t have to remove them again. Below are some ideas for selecting the right lights for your Christmas tree, and some tips on how to decorate with them.

  • Use 50-foot light strands. According to Better Homes and Gardens, these lights are less likely to have electrical problems or burn out. If you want subdued lighting, Better Homes’ website suggests 12 boxes of 50-foot light strands for a 6-foot tree, or 20 boxes for an 8-foot tree. If you prefer a brighter look, use 20 boxes for a 6-foot tree or 30 boxes for an 8-foot tree.
  • Check the Christmas lights before you start putting them on the tree. Make sure all the strands are untangled and that none of the light bulbs are loose. Plug each into an electrical socket to ensure that they work and that none of the bulbs are burnt out. Continue reading »
 Posted by on October 18, 2012 at 10:11 am
Oct 152012
 

The New York Institute of Art + Design recently published this mood board about industrial design on their blog:

Image via /blog.nyiad.edu

According to NYIAD, the industrial look features “unfinished woods, metals, and exposed structural work.”

What I love about industrial design is how lighting is so integral. Not only do the right fixtures (like the galactic chandelier shown above) add to the raw, material aesthetic, they also keep your bare-bones rooms from feeling too dismal.

Here are a few other “industrial” lights that will keep your home looking modern and mechanized, but never bleak. Continue reading »

 Posted by on October 15, 2012 at 12:27 pm
Oct 032012
 

With the debate tonight and Election Day a month away, I’m in a presidential state of mind. No matter who we choose to run the country for the next 4 years, he’s going to live in a stunning, immaculately lit home.

While much of the White House décor would overpower a regular-sized home, we can take away concepts from its lighting scheme to make our own dwellings more beautiful. Here are a few universal lighting principles carried out Washington-style:

Layer those lights! See: The China Room

While I was scrolling through photos on WhiteHouse.gov, I noted that every room had two, three, four different light sources. For instance, in the China Room created by First Lady Edith Wilson in 1917, there’s not only a beautiful chandelier for overhead lighting, but there are also wall sconces and even display lights in the china cabinets. This adds visual interest, eliminates unflattering shadows, and creates striking focal points.

Photo via WhiteHouse.gov

Light layering is a flattering design strategy in any room in your house, but I chose The China Room so you could see how pretty it looks to have illuminated cabinets, hutches, shelves, and display cases. It might not be your first impulse to install a few linear or puck lights, but it’s really easy to do, and will make your cabinet’s contents and the entire room dazzle.

Know your color temperature. See: The State Dining Room

When we think of classic, traditional lighting, we often summon images of warm incandescent lights, as close to candle light as we can get. But, The State Dining Room shows us that cooler white light can be just as dignified. The daylight white light of the chandelier and sconces is unexpectedly cool, but it looks great! This color temperature is perfect to offset the clean white walls and crisp table cloths – a warmer light source may make things look too yellow.

Photo via WhiteHouse.gov

Continue reading »

Sep 212012
 

If you’ve never visited the DIY, home renovation blog Young House Love, you’re in for a treat. John and Sherry, bloggers extraordinaire, are renovating their home step-by-step, giving their readers a detailed look into the process. Every day they have some new clever project to write about. (And the way they tell stories gets addictive, quick).

The blog has a ton of posts on home lighting, some technical, some crazy and fun. Today, I thought I’d share with you my 3 favorite DIY lighting projects from Young House Love:

Courtesy of YoungHouseLove.com

1. The Basket Pendant

Who would have thought a thrift store basket could become such a striking focal point? Using an old consignment pendant light (for the lighting kit) and some makeshift hardware, this light was up and ready with only minimal assembly required.

I love this project for 3 reasons: First, the way the light plays with the basket casts the neatest shadows on the ceiling. Second, this project is so simple, you can use almost anything you want (within reason) to make a really personal, meaningful centerpiece for your room. Finally, the basket Sherry and John used is actually a fishing basket, used in many African and Asian countries. What a cool fact!

Courtesy of YoungHouseLove.com

2. The Chandelier-Turned-Office-Light

For this lighting project, John and Sherry modernized an outdated chandelier in their office that just didn’t match their aesthetic at all. All they did was doctor up the old bronze chandelier with a little indigo spray paint, and attach it to a giant drum shade for a much sleeker edge.

What I think is totally remarkable here is how Sherry and John used a fixture that they already had – just made some unexpected changes to help it fit their style. Continue reading »

 Posted by on September 21, 2012 at 12:09 pm
Sep 142012
 

Have you seen Philips’ series of lighting makeovers? They’re all on YouTube, showing how LED lights can positively change the lives of people around the world. Seriously, LEDs can solve so many common lighting problems, it’s almost unbelievable! I’ve picked out my three favorites to share with you, featuring three unique problems and their ingenious LED solutions, but you can view all 20+ here.

This first LED makeover takes place in Amsterdam. A couple has been trying to sell their flat for over a year, and they haven’t gotten anyone to bite…

With inadequate lighting, real estate agents complain about low ceilings and a gloomy atmosphere. After the lighting makeover, the agents focus on the unique architectural features, the bright kitchen, and the cozy mood. And when post-lightover they price the flat at 40,000 euros more, it really makes you marvel at the power of LEDs! Continue reading »

 Posted by on September 14, 2012 at 1:33 pm

Sign up to receive each new post delivered directly to your email inbox.