May 292013
 

Reading Lights Pegasus Lighting Roundup: Lighting In May
It’s time for our monthly update on the most exciting happenings in the lighting world!

In Lighting News…

According to e! Science News, the new production of dual-color lasers could lead to cheaper, more efficient LEDs. It’s normally very costly and difficult to physically put together several lasers of different colors in one LED, but researchers at Arizona State University are about to change that. Read more.

On May 15, the US Department of Energy issued new protocols for calculating savings from energy efficient home, commercial, and industrial upgrades. The new protocols are voluntary, but formulated to encourage a common structure to determine energy savings based on average efficiency measures. Read more.

Lighting magazine recently published an article by lighting designer James Bedell about lighting CRI (Color Rendering Index). CRI is defined as the measure of how accurately a light portrays color, but Bedell argues that CRI actually has very little to do with how our eyes see colors. Instead, the CQS (Color Quality Scale) proves to be a more accurate measure. Read more.

A new study at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) found a link between energy efficient homes and morgage risks. It seems that owners of ENERGY STAR-certified houses are less likely to default on their home loans. Read more. Continue reading »

Apr 292013
 
Midwest Energy News1 300x200 Pegasus Lighting Roundup: Lighting in April

Image via Midwest Energy News

A lot has been happening in the lighting world lately. Here are this month’s highlights…

In Lighting News…

Turkeys Love LEDs: A Minnesota turkey farmer is using LED lights to keep his turkeys happy and healthy. Every morning, Mike Langmo uses his dimmable, programmable LED lights to simulate a sunrise for his flock. There’s evidence that this practice is helping regulate their circadian rhythms, possibly contributing to their health and well-being. Read how it works here.

LED Prices Dropping: Two months ago, Cree announced they would be selling an LED light bulb for less than $10 in the US. Now, Osram has revealed that their new LED replacement for the 40W incandescent will retail at €9.95 in Germany. With prices going down this rapidly, LED light bulbs are becoming more attractive to consumers. Read more about this event here.

Most Efficient LED?: Philips has also been stepping up their game this month, claiming to have created the world’s most efficient lamp. It’s an LED tube light replacement prototype that produces 200 lumens of pure white light for every watt it uses. Learn the details here. Continue reading »

Mar 252013
 

Here’s what’s been going on in the lighting world this month…

In Lighting News…

A Wal-Mart store in Mt. Pleasant, Wisconsin has equipped all its indoor and outdoor facilities with LED lights. The areas now illuminated by LEDs include the sales floor, pharmacy, restrooms, stock rooms, and the parking lot. Wal-Mart expects to save at least 30% of their energy costs, compared to their old fluorescent lighting systems. Click here to learn more.

On March 5th “The Bay Lights,” an LED light sculpture, illuminated San Francisco’s Bay Bridge for the first time with 25,000 LED lights. The project only costs $15.06 per night to operate, and was designed by artist Leo Villareal on a laptop. Check out this video from the grand lighting ceremony:

Continue reading »

Feb 252013
 

What’s been on the tip of everyone’s tongue this month? One word: quality. From new standards for quality lights, to tips on using light to improve your quality of life, we’ve got you covered. Here are this month’s top stories…

In Lighting News…

Is Color Rendering Index (CRI) the most accurate measure of a light’s quality? With all the innovations happening in the lighting world right now, the Color Quality Scale (CQS) might just be a better judge. CRI measures a light’s performance rendering only 8 different colors. CQS, on the other hand, measures 15, and accounts for other factors like chromatic discrimination and human preference. Click here to learn more about CQS.

news ucdavis edu Pegasus Lighting Roundup: Lighting in February

Image via News.UCDavis.edu

In December 2012 the California Lighting Technology Center at the University of California, Davis helped encourage the California Energy Commission to include new standards of quality for LED replacement lamps in its first-in-the-nation energy-efficiency directive. Now, the center is pushing for similar LED standards on a national scale. You can learn more about this initiative here. Continue reading »

 Posted by on February 25, 2013 at 11:44 am
Feb 112013
 

Kozzi Computer Keyboard  and Monitor 426x304 300x214 LEDs Allow New Method of Data Transmission
At the University of Strathclyde, researchers are developing tiny LEDs that can deliver Wi-Fi-like internet access. Called Li-Fi (short for Light Fidelity), this system has the potential to transmit data several times faster than what we’re used to.

Professor Martin Dawson and his team created tiny LEDs, each about the size of an end of human hair, which flicker on and off thousands of times every second. By altering the length of these flickers, the lights can send digital information to computers and other electronic devices. Picture it as a sort of digital Morse code.

The micron-sized LEDs are made so small to allow for more data transmission at a faster rate. The university’s LEDs can flicker at a rate 1,000 times faster than larger LEDs. Why? Well, if you have 1,000 micron-sized LEDs, they can fit into the same space as a single 1mm LED. Each tiny LED acts as an individual communication channel, which allows the transmission of about a million times more data.

Suddenly, a large LED display, with each tiny LED acting as a pixel, can also allow internet communications. Continue reading »

 Posted by on February 11, 2013 at 11:01 am
Feb 052013
 

PAR LED LED Rebates For 2013
Considering switching your commercial lighting to LEDs this year? Learn how to get the most out of lighting rebates and incentives. 

Have you gone shopping for new light bulbs or fixtures lately? If the answer is yes, you’re probably aware that LED lighting options have saturated the market as energy efficient alternatives to incandescent, halogen, and fluorescent lights.

But, what you might not know is that there are tons of rebates and incentives out there for buying LEDs that can help you save money when making the switch.

Since January 2012 the number of rebate programs for LEDs has increased by 54%.

Here’s an overview of the kind of rebates your company can expect in 2013:

Rebate Snapshot LED 1 13 LED Rebates For 2013

If you’re already familiar with rebates from electric utilities and government organizations in your area, you may notice that the dollar amounts for most rebates have decreased over the past year. The average rebate for an LED replacement lamp has gone down by 7% since last January. Rebates amounts also decreased for LED fixtures: recessed down lights decreased by 66%, accent lighting by 12%, and high bay fixtures by 8%.

You needn’t be alarmed by these numbers, though. They’ve only been adjusted to match the lower prices of LEDs in 2013. Less money is necessary to make purchasing an LED financially attractive. Also, since there are over twice the programs this year, money is even more accessible. Continue reading »

 Posted by on February 5, 2013 at 11:18 am
Feb 042013
 

Well, they told us yesterday’s Super Bowl would be the greenest one to date, but they failed to mention that as part of the plan to save energy they were going to turn the lights out in the second half.

Just kidding. This year’s Super Bowl might go down in the books for its lighting “abnormality,” but certainly there were some “bright spots” about this year’s lighting as well. Today, I’m going to reflect on  both.

Superbowl Blackout NY Times Lighting Wins and Losses From Super Bowl XLVII

Image via NYTimes.com

Here at Pegasus Lighting, we were all so excited to ogle the Mercedes-Benz Superdome’s new lighting system, and it didn’t disappoint. (At least through halftime, that is.)  The Superdome’s exterior featured more than 26,000 LED lights on a whopping 96 full-color graphic display panels. These panels flooded the building in a spectrum of animated colors, patterns,and images. We were especially impressed knowing that the system used only 10 kilowatts of electricity, which if you can believe it, is the amount used to power a small house. Not to mention that if the LEDs are used for an average of 6 hours per day, they won’t need to be replaced until 2057.

Super Dome Washington Post Lighting Wins and Losses From Super Bowl XLVII

Image via WashingtonPost.com

Continue reading »

 Posted by on February 4, 2013 at 12:33 pm
Jan 292013
 

We consider light pretty important over here at Pegasus. For hours, we could talk your ear off about LED innovations and fluorescent installations. Although choosing the right under cabinet light is important, and knowing how to place your recessed cans is essential, there is no light as vital to the human body as a little sunshine.

Especially in these winter months, it can be hard for us to get enough sun exposure. This can have a poor influence on your mood and immune system, plus it deprives you of vitamin D, which helps prevent serious diseases light arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. Check out this infographic for the details:

 

Sunlight Info graphic Sunshine And Your Health: An Infographic

 

This Infographic Was Provided By Carrington College’s Medical Assistant Training Program.

 

 Posted by on January 29, 2013 at 10:35 am
Jan 282013
 

incandescent 300x199 Pegasus Lighting Roundup: Lighting in January

Image via Cleveland.com


It’s a new year, and we’re back to keep you up-to-date on what’s happening in the lighting world. So far, 2013 has brought us tons of lighting innovations, brilliant tips on improving your life with light, and some just plain cool stuff…

In Lighting News…

Starting January 1, import and manufacture of the 75-watt incandescent light bulb were banned in the U.S. as part of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The goal here is to move the country to a higher efficiency standard to save energy, money, and natural resources. To learn more about the act, how it affects consumers, and how to adapt, check out this article from Cleveland.com or our own recent blog post on the matter.

Philips has come out with a new way to try on clothing in retail shops called the AmbiScene Fitting Room System. The system’s LEDs let customers adjust the lighting in their dressing rooms. To see how your clothes look in different places, you can choose settings that mimic the seasons, different times of day, and even different locations like the office or a nightclub. The system is also perfect for retail displays. Check out this video to see how it works:

Continue reading »

 Posted by on January 28, 2013 at 12:12 pm
Jan 242013
 

Stock Photo Shattered Light Bulb Next Phase Of EISA: Losing The 75 Watt Incandescent
As of January 1, 2013, the second phase of EISA has taken effect, banning the import and production of 75-watt incandescent light bulbs.

For those unfamiliar, EISA stands for the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. President Bush signed this act during his second term, and it aims to do the following:

  • Move the U.S. toward greater energy independence and security
  • Increase the production of clean, renewable fuels
  • Increase the efficiency of products, buildings, and vehicles
  • Promote research on and set up greenhouse gas capture and storage options
  • Improve the energy performance of the Federal Government
  • Increase U.S. energy security, develop renewable fuel production, and improve vehicle fuel economy

One of the main goals enacted by this legislation is to raise appliance and lighting efficiency standards, which is what has brought about the incandescent light phase outs. These older incandescent lamps just don’t meet the mark.

Last January, we said goodbye to the 100-watt incandescent lamp, and now the 75-watt has followed. It’s likely you’ll still see them in stores in coming months, but with the ban on importing or manufacturing these lights, the supplies we already have will dwindle and eventually run out. Now, a light bulb must use 53 watts or less if it emits the equivalent lumens of a 75-watt incandescent light.

These new standards are technology neutral, so any kind of light bulb can still be sold, as long as it meets the efficiency requirements. Continue reading »

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