Sep 192011
 

light bulb My Search for a New Light BulbAs most of us now know, the traditional incandescent light bulb invented over 100 years ago is being phased out over the next couple of years. To learn more about the incandescent phase out, or if you are like “What?!”, make sure to check out our coverage on the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) – aka “the incandescent phase out”.

Whether or not you agree with the law, and there are plenty of opinions both for and against, it is coming. In fact, the first phase starts this January 2012 when the 100-watt incandescent light bulb will no longer be able to be manufactured or imported. In January 2013 it will be the 75-watt light bulb and in January 2014, the 60-watt and 40-watt light bulbs.

So, knowing this is coming, and knowing that I have a lot of light bulbs in my house that will need to be replaced, including 100-watt ones, I decided to start exploring my options and figured I would share them with you.

What did I learn?

  1. There are options available now.
  2. There is no one option for me. I will be using different technologies based upon my needs and wants.
  3. GE makes a very cool hybrid light bulb which is part halogen and compact fluorescent that I am now using.
  4. There are halogen replacements for incandescent light bulbs…did not know this.
  5. Philips has a very cool, very awesome, somewhat expensive, LED light bulb called AmbientLED. I wish I could afford many of these because they work very, very well.

Now on to the story…

Continue reading »

Jul 122011
 
Rick Perry Texas Fighting for Old Fashioned Incandescent Light Bulbs

Texas Gov. Rick Perry

The Texas state legislature recently passed a bill that is decidedly challenging Washington on the upcoming energy regulations for incandescent light bulbs.

The bill, H.B. 2510, declares that incandescent light bulbs produced and sold in Texas are exempt from the federal law as they do not involve interstate commerce.

The measure was signed into law by Republican Gov. Rick Perry.  However, supporters of the federal energy regulations say the Texas law would be unlikely to withstand a court challenge.

Texas’s deputy director of the Public Citizen office, David Power, reports that Texas would not be able to manufacture incandescent light bulbs in the near future, anyway:

We don’t mine tungsten in Texas.  So there is no place where they can get a Texas-made filament for bulbs.

Pennsylvania and South Carolina are reportedly seeking similar efforts to skirt the federal mandate.

Jul 122011
 

shattered misconceptions Light Bulb Bill Put To the Test Today

Update (7/13): The BULB Act did not pass in the House of Representatives.  The vote was 233 in favor of the repeal and 193 opposed.  Since that didn’t constitute a two-thirds majority, it did not go on to the Senate.

As the incandescent phase out approaches, with today’s standard 100W light bulb set to face new efficiency standards beginning in January 2012, a Republican-sponsored bill is seeking to halt the changing standards before they even happen.

The repeal bill, called the Better Use of Light Bulbs Act, H.R. 2417 (BULB Act), would eliminate the portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) that requires incandescent light bulbs to be 25 to 30 percent more efficient.

Supporters of the BULB Act say that mandating efficiency standards in light bulbs will limit consumer choice and result in unnecessary government intervention.

Perhaps supporters of the BULB Act have not heard about the many replacement options for inefficient incandescent light bulbs?   Or the fact that this legislation will save U.S. households a great deal of money in energy costs (about $15.8 billion per year)?

The U.S. House of Representatives was expected to vote yesterday on the repeal bill, but the vote has been delayed until at least today.

A two-thirds majority vote will be required for the repeal bill to continue on to the Senate.

Jun 222011
 

Lumen Output Chart1 How To Shop for Light BulbsStill shopping for light bulbs based on watts?  If you’re not confused by the packaging yet, you soon will be.

You see, purchasing a light bulb based on how many watts it uses (i.e., assuming a 60 watt light bulb is brighter than a 40 watt light bulb) is quickly becoming outdated.

With high-efficiency light bulbs like CFLs and LEDs, watts (which measure the amount of power consumed) are not necessarily equivalent to light ouput.  Some 11 watt LEDs can produce just as much light output as a 40 or 60 watt incandescent.

For an easy way to put lumens into perspective, use the chart on the right provided by the Federal Trade Commission.

As you can see, if you are replacing a 60 watt incandescent light bulb, you should look for a light bulb rated at 800 lumens.

May 102011
 

vu1corp lamp A New Player in the Light Bulb GameAs the incandescent phase out rapidly approaches, light bulb manufacturers are focusing on developing quality alternatives for the familiar incandescent light bulb.  Last month, General Electric announced a new “hybrid” light bulb that will combine the efficiency of a compact fluorescent with the instant brightness of a halogen.

Now, a New York based company is joining the alternative light bulb battle.  Vu1 Corporation has developed a lamp based on the same technology used in picture tube TVs.  Inside the lamp, a stream of electrons is fired at phosphors coating the inside glass.  Those phosphors illuminate to create high-quality light that lasts about 10 times longer than a traditional incandescent light bulb.

According to the New York Times, Vu1 Corporation’s potential success lies in the fact that its light bulbs are less expensive than LEDs, yet comparably energy-efficient.  However, industry experts claim the price of LED lamps will continue to fall within the next couple of years.  Vu1 Corporation’s value proposition may be short-lived.

Currently, the company’s website only offers a 65-watt-equivalent reflector lamp (for ceiling installations).  They plan to expand their selection in the future.

Apr 082011
 

hybrid light bulb Hybrid Light BulbsGeneral Electric announced it will be releasing a unique new light bulb on Earth Day.

Apparently, “hybrid” will not just be all about cars anymore.

This light bulb is a combination halogen-compact fluorescent (CFL) built inside a glass bulb shaped like a traditional incandescent. GE is calling it a hybrid-halogen CFL, and advertising it as “three bulbs in one.”

The instant brightness factor makes our new hybrid halogen-CFL more versatile than other CFLs. Simply flip that light switch and it’s at your service – immediately.” Kristin Gibbs, general manager of consumer marketing, GE Lighting

The light bulb will be available in GE Energy Smart, Soft White, and Reveal bulbs, price between $5.99 and $9.99.  Add it to the list of replacement contenders for the standard incandescent light bulb, which will be phased out beginning January 1, 2012.

Will you be buying one?

Mar 252011
 

Turning off the incandescent The Expected Impact: The Incandescent Phase Out, Part 5This post concludes our week-long series featuring everything you ever needed to know about the upcoming incandescent phase out as a result of the EISA 2007.  Our other posts in the series: Truth & Lies; The Fine Print, Explained; The Inclusions & Exceptions; The Replacement Contenders.  Thanks for reading as always, and here’s hoping you are now an expert on the phase out!

You may be thinking: “Okay, I get that the EISA 2007 was designed to reduce energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions… but is an incandescent phase out really going to make all that much of a difference?”

The short answer?  Yes. Continue reading »

Mar 242011
 

On the bench The Replacement Contenders: The Incandescent Phase Out, Part 4This post is part of our week-long series about the upcoming incandescent phase out as a result of the EISA 2007.  If you haven’t been reading so far, check out Parts 1, 2, and 3!

One of the biggest misconceptions among the public and news media is that compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) are the only replacements for incandescent light bulbs.  It couldn’t be farther from the truth.

There are currently at least three widely-known technology options that can replace incandescent light bulbs and deliver the required higher efficiency, and more innovative technological options lay just around the corner.  Three other light sources that are lesser known and not discussed below are cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), induction lamps, and electron stimulated luminescence lamps (ESL). Continue reading »

Mar 232011
 

Not All Incandescents Affected The Inclusions & Exceptions: The Incandescent Phase Out, Part 3This post is part of a week-long series explaining the upcoming incandescent phase out as a result of the EISA 2007.  If you’ve missed the posts so far, make sure to check out Part 1 and Part 2!

We’ve already gone over common misconceptions about the phase out and explained when you can expect this all to happen.  Now, for the next tidbit of information:

Did you know that the efficiency standards set by the EISA 2007 do not apply to all incandescent bulbs?  In fact, there’s a pretty long list of special-use incandescent lamps that have been excluded – one of which is the 3-way incandescent light bulb, a very popular consumer product. Continue reading »

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