Oct 252012
 

To be honest, I’ve always liked the look of CFLs. Yes, there have been mixed opinions about the quality of light they generate, but there’s something about that gentle swirl that I can’t help but enjoy. And of course, the CFL has come a long way from what was first out on the market.

See here:

Hanging Plumens Not Your Average CFL

Image via Plumen.com

You can imagine my excitement when I first saw the Plumen 001, winner of the Brit Insurance Design of the Year Award and you guessed it, a CFL. Continue reading »

 Posted by on October 25, 2012 at 10:55 am
Sep 072012
 

Fluorescent Lamp T8 How To Cope When Your Favorite Light Bulb Gets The Shaft: Fluorescent Light Bulbs
This is the third installment of a three-part series on replacing EISA phased-out light bulbs – what’s leaving and why. You can read the first post on household A lamps here, and the second on reflector lamps here.  

Discontinued Fluorescents

T12 fluorescent light bulbs have been around since the ’30s, and in light bulb years, that’s just too plain old. Technology’s potential for efficiency, for saving you time and money, has moved light-years since then. That’s why the T12 phase-out began in July this year. This phase-out affected nearly all T12s, with the exception of the cold temperature lamps and a few others. Most T12s now have gone the way of typewriters and VCRs, cassette tapes and rotary phones – delightful relics, but come on people, we’re better than this.

We’ve also listed one T8 lamp with the group. While T8s are much newer, and most are much more efficient than T12s, the lamps listed are the oldest and most basic of their kind. They have the least lumens and the shortest lives of all the T8s, so while they’re cheap, they’re simply not a good value.

Here’s how to update:

Lamp

Date Discontinued

Good Replacements

Great Replacements

Slimline F96T12 60W

July 14, 2012

800 Series Slimline F96T8 59W

Coming Soon

High Output F96T12

July 14, 2012

800 Series High Output F96T8 86W

Coming Soon

Rapid Start F34T12

July 14, 2012

800 Series T8 32W

800 Series Energy Saving T8 25W and 28W

U-Bend FB34T12

July 14, 2012

800 Series U-Bend T8

800 Series Energy Savings U-Bend T8 25W

700 Series T8 32W

2014

800 Series T8 32W

800 Series Energy Saving T8 25W and 28W

Continue reading »

 Posted by on September 7, 2012 at 9:58 am
Sep 052012
 

Reflector How To Cope When Your Favorite Light Bulb Gets The Shaft: Reflector Lamps
This post is the second in a three part series on EISA light bulb phase-outs: what’s leaving, why it’s leaving, and how we can cope. If you missed the first post on household lamps, you can find it here

Discontinued Reflector Lamps

New standards have also hit the halogen and incandescent reflector lamps that don’t meet efficiency requirements set by the EISA. The act affects the following:

  • BR, ER, and BPAR lamps
  • Reflector lamps between 2.25” (R18) and 2.75” (R22) in diameter
  • Lamps that have a rated wattage of 40 watts or higher

It really boils down to a lumens per watt issue here. If a lamp doesn’t produce enough light for the amount of energy it consumes, it’s on the way out.

Here’s your guide to the new LPW standards as of 7/14/12 for 40W-205W lamps*:

Lamp Size (Diameter) Voltage Minimum Lumens Per Watt Replacement Options
2.5” (R20 and PAR20) 120V 13.5 to 21.0 LPW LED, CFL, Halogen IR
130V 15.4 to 24.0 LPW LED, CFL Halogen IR
>2.5” (PAR30, PAR38, BR30, BR40, ER30, ER40) 120V 16.0 to 24.8 LPW LED, CFL, Halogen IR
130V 18.4 to 28.6 LPW LED, CFL, Halogen IR

*Exemptions to these standards include: Rough service or vibration lamps; colored PAR lamps; BR30, BR40, and ER40 lamps rated at 65 watts; ER30, BR30, BR40, and ER40 lamps rated at 50 watts or less; R20 lamps rated at 45 watts or less. These regulations apply to standard spectrum reflector lamps only. For modified spectrum lamps standards are approximately 17% less stringent. For more info check out this article. Continue reading »

 Posted by on September 5, 2012 at 10:05 am
Sep 042012
 

A light 224x300 How To Cope When Your Favorite Light Bulb Gets The Shaft: Household A Lamps
Love your light bulbs like they’re going out of style? Bad news: some of them actually are. As of January this year, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) began its push to phase-out inefficient incandescent, fluorescent, and halogen light bulbs.

This is the first in a three part series to help you find the perfect replacement for almost any discontinued light bulb. In this post we’ll review the incandescent phase-out, which household A lamps are on the way out, and the benefits of various replacements. In the next two posts we’ll probe new territory, learning about discontinued reflector lamps and fluorescent light bulbs, why they’re getting the boot and how to handle the changes…    

Discontinued Household Lamps

General service incandescent lamps (the run-of-the-mill medium screw base light bulbs) have already begun to disappear, and will continue to do so for the next few years (excluding only certain lamps). This phase out will probably affect the general public most directly, since these lamps are so popular, but it’s also one of the easiest changes to adapt to. The new regulations have raised the standards for rated life and lumen output, and have set a ceiling for how many watts a single lamp can use. The iconic incandescent A lamps just don’t cut it.

Here are your new standards:

Lamp

Date Discontinued

New Lumen Range

New Max Watts

New Min Rated Life

Replacement Options

100W A19

Jan 1, 2012

1490-2600

72W

1000 hours

Halogen, CFL, (and LED coming soon)

75W A19

Jan 1, 2013

1050-1489

53W

1000 hours

Halogen, CFL, and LED

60W A19*

Jan 1, 2014

750-1049

43W

1000 hours

Halogen, CFL, and LED

40W A19

Jan 1, 2014

310-749

29W

1000 hours

Halogen, CFL, and LED

*A heads up: 60W B10 chandelier and 60W G25 globe light bulbs are also getting the boot on 1-1-14, but you can also replace them with halogens, CFLs, and LEDs.

Continue reading »

Aug 212012
 

It’s true, we often pay a lot of attention to shape. This infographic, in fact, makes a career of it! It’ll help you learn to identify each screw-in light bulb by it’s shape – everything from the slinky little chandelier light bulb to the festively rotund globe.

a guide to screw in light bulbs by shape Hey, Light Bulb, I Like Your Shape (A Guide)

Dying to put this infographic on your website or blog? Go for it! Here’s the embed code:

<img src=”http://images.pegasuslighting.com/infographics/a-guide-to-screw-in-light-bulbs-by-shape.png” width=”600″ height=”3500″>
<br><br> <strong>A Guide to Screw-in Light Bulbs: By Shape</strong> created by <a href=”http://www.pegasuslighting.com”>Pegasus Lighting</a>.

 

Aug 082012
 

 

An age old saga wages on…

heartbeat Pulse Start vs. Probe Start Metal Halide Lamps: What’s The Difference?

Okay, okay, enough with the silliness. You may have heard the terminology “pulse start” and “probe start” in relation to metal halide light bulbs, but what does that even mean? And when you’re faced with that epic dilemma: “Which metal halide lamp do I choose?” and you’re not a certified lighting professional, what’s a person to do?

Gather round, young grasshoppers, let me explain. Continue reading »

Jul 182012
 
HID Lamps EnergySavers.gov  197x300 The Low Down on High Intensity Discharge (HID) Lamps

Courtesy of EnergySavers.gov

HID lamps offer bright, efficient alternatives to filament lamps like incandescents and halogens. They’re found illuminating parking lots, streets, and indoor arenas, among other commercial, industrial, and outdoor locations. What is an HID lamp, you ask? Read on to find out…

All HID (High Intensity Discharge) lamps produce light by passing electricity through a gas (called an arc discharge) between two electrodes at either end of the lamp’s arc tube. There are four different kinds of HID lamps, each with its own unique properties:

  1. Mercury Vapor is the oldest of the HID lamps, and is on the way out. New federal laws have begun prohibiting the manufacturing and importation of this product. A mercury vapor lamp’s rated life ranges anywhere from 16,000 to 24,000 hours, but with an output of only 25-60 lumens per watt and a poor CRI of 50, there are better choices out there.
  2. Low Pressure Sodium lamps are classified as HID, but lack a compact, high intensity arc. Instead, the long stretched-out arc has more in common with a fluorescent light. Low pressure sodium lamps are the most efficient of HID lamps, producing the most lumens per watt (up to 150 l/w), but their stark yellow color produces extremely poor color rendition (a CRI of 0),  limiting their use to lighting streets, tunnels, and parking lots. They last anywhere from 14,000 to 18,000 hours.
  3. High Pressure Sodium light sources have become increasingly more popular over the years, and with their efficacy of 50-140 lumens per watt, we can see why. Compared to low pressure sodium lamps, these lights produce a slightly less severe yellowish white light, making them a more versatile light source. Their lifetime ranges from 16,000 to 24,000 hours, which makes them a smart choice for most outdoor lighting applications.
  4. Metal Halide lamps have a CRI that ranges from fair to very good (between 65 and 90) – the best color rendering index of the bunch. This high CRI means that metal halide lamps thrive in many applications that require white light with good color rendering – they’re replacing high pressure sodium lamps in some applications and certain MH lamps are even used in retail displays!  The lamp itself is very similar to a mercury vapor lamp, but the added metal halide gas provides a higher light output, more lumens per watt (65-115 l/w), and a better color rendering. The biggest drawback to a metal halide lamp is its rated-life, which is capped at about 20,000 hours. Continue reading »
Jun 282012
 

Stock Photo Bathroom Lighting How To Choose Light Bulbs For Your Home: Bathroom Light Bars

You depend on it to prevent shaving nicks and makeup mishaps. It wakes you up in the morning; it’s one of the last lights you turn off before bed. Bathroom lighting is crucial to your home. How much thought do you give to your bathroom light bulbs?

We’ve written a couple of posts on bathroom lighting: this one explains a few design tips to enhance the space, and this one advises you not to use recessed downlights over the mirror to avoid the Dracula effect. For those of you who are looking for light bulbs to your bathroom light bar appropriately:

  • The best bathroom lighting emulates sunlight. Heard of G.E. Reveal light bulbs? They have a special coating of an element called neodymium - you’ll see that the light bulbs have a bluish tint when turned off. That neodymium coating helps create something very close to natural, outdoor light.
  • Keep an eye on Color Rendering Index (CRI) – it’s a measure of how accurately your light bulb renders colors. In the bathroom, you want a high CRI. It’s measured on a scale of 1 to 100, with 100 being sunlight. Anything 85 or above is considered to be very good.
  • Many people don’t think about dimmability in the bathroom, but it’s a very useful feature. Ever felt like you’re blinded by the light first thing in the morning, or wished it didn’t have to be so harsh for late-night trips to the bathroom? If you install a dimmer, you can create those low-light conditions without sacrificing the bright light levels you need the rest of the day.

So, there you have it: For bathroom light bars, look for dimmable, neodymium-coated light bulbs with a high CRI.

Jun 272012
 

blogpost fan How To Choose Light Bulbs For Your Home: Ceiling Fans

Lighted ceiling fans are making their debut today in our “How To Choose Light Bulbs For Your Home” series. (Catch up on our tips for table/floor lamps here, and here for recessed light fixtures).

Ceiling fans with light fixtures are installed for a lot of different reasons. Before you choose light bulbs to go in yours, you need to think about what purpose it serves.

Is it the sole source of light in the entire room? First and foremost, we would recommend remedying that by adding a lamp or two, or perhaps a few recessed lights. Lighting serves multiple purposes in a room, and it’s pretty impossible for one light fixture to do it all.

If that’s not possible, or you’re just not willing to devote more money to your lighting budget at this time, then you’ll need to make sure you can get as much illumination as possible out of the ceiling fan. Take a close look at lumen output of the light bulbs you’re considering – anything less than 800 lumens (the equivalent of a standard 60-watt incandescent light bulb) won’t do it. For more information about lumen output, see here. Continue reading »

Jun 262012
 

blogpost recessedlights1 How To Choose Light Bulbs For Your Home: Recessed Cans

This is the second post in a series dedicated to helping you create a home with beautiful lighting by choosing the best light bulbs. Yesterday, we tackled light bulbs for table and floor lamps. Recessed lights are a little more complicated, but once you’ve got the basics down, it’s smooth sailing!

The first thing you’ll need to do is determine which light bulb size your recessed light fixture takes. Here’s what you’ll see among recessed lighting options: BR30, MR11, MR16, PAR16, PAR20, PAR30, PAR38, R20, R30, R40.

Wow. Let’s break that down a little: Continue reading »

Like Our Blog?

Sign up to receive each new post delivered directly to your email inbox.

Thank you! Our next blog post will be delivered to your email inbox.

Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!

Please provide a valid email address.

Please complete the CAPTCHA.

Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again.