May 032013
 

Kozzi mid section of a person with hard hat and tool belt 312x416 224x300 The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: Durability
Do you know what makes an LED different from a CFL? In this blog series, we’re explaining just that!

We all know incandescent light bulbs are delicate. You break that filament, and it’s lights out (literally). It’s easy to understand why our basic incandescent lights are so fragile – we can see and understand the simple internal structure at a glance. But, when it comes to understanding the capabilities of LEDs and CFLs, the answers aren’t as straightforward. Both light sources use more complex systems to generate light, but does this make them any less breakable?

It’s time to dive a little deeper.

LEDs:

Since LEDs don’t use a filament, they can easily withstand almost any kind of jarring vibration. When you’re rough on LEDs, transporting them from place to place while in use, or keeping them in jolt-prone spots (like in and around elevators), you don’t have to worry about easily breaking or damaging them. Continue reading »

Apr 302013
 

LED Reflector Lamp The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: Glass Envelope
If you’re deciding which light source to use for your next project, look no further! In this blog series, we’re going in-depth to explore the differences between LEDs and CFLs, so you can make the best decision. In this post, we’re talking about structure…

LEDs and CFLs are built very differently.

LED light bulbs use glass or plastic envelopes of almost any thickness. They’re built to last, even in the most demanding circumstances. CFLs, on the other hand, have a daintier construction. If you drop one, the thinner glass envelope could easily break. This can be a problem, especially because CFLs contain trace amounts of mercury that will be released when the light bulb shatters.

To prevent CFLs from cracking so easily, some manufacturers have begun encasing CFLs in silicone coatings, so even if the glass breaks the shards and mercury will stay within the silicone, not allowed to get into your environment. The CFL’s traditional spiral is covered by a more conventionally shaped envelope like this: Continue reading »

Apr 262013
 

iStock 000006954225Small 300x199 Outfitting Recessed Can Lights: LED Light Bulbs, LED Retrofits, or LED Housings?
When using LEDs in your recessed can lights, should you install completely new LED housings and trims, use LED retrofit modules, or simply switch out your light bulbs for LEDs?

A customer recently contacted Pegasus Lighting with that very question. She wanted to use LEDs in her recessed cans, and asked us about the advantages and disadvantages of LED housings/trims, retrofits, and light bulbs in order to make her decision.

So, our lighting experts went to work crafting an answer. Here’s what they had to say:

When Using An LED Lamp With A Conventional Incandescent Housing And Trim…

L Prize Light Bulb Outfitting Recessed Can Lights: LED Light Bulbs, LED Retrofits, or LED Housings?

This option is by far the simplest. Just unscrew that old incandescent or halogen light bulb and replace it with an LED lamp. Depending on the size of your recessed can, you can use LED reflector lamps or A lamps.

Advantages:

  • Easy To Alter. It only takes one person to screw in a light bulb (usually). So, if you don’t like how your new LED light bulb looks or performs, you can switch it out for a different one with minimal hassle. Since LED innovations are still evolving and LED efficacy is increasing dramatically each year, using LED light bulbs gives you more freedom to try out new technology. With a more extensive LED system, it would be annoying and expensive to try to keep up with new technology.

  • Generally Cheaper Upfront. LED light bulbs for recessed cans can cost anywhere from about $15 to over $100, while the prices for LED retrofits and LED housings and trims range from around $30 to over $200.

Disadvantages:

  • Could Trip Your Circuit Breaker. LED light bulbs and conventional recessed can lights aren’t always compatible. Some of the LED light bulbs used in halogen and incandescent recessed lights might cause a heat sensor inside the housing to trip your circuit breaker. This is because LED lamps generally direct heat up towards the ceiling and the fixture’s heat sensor, while incandescent sources project heat down and out of the recessed light. Continue reading »

Apr 192013
 

Kozzi dark sunglasses 441x294 300x200 The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: Infrared and UV Radiation
We won’t rest until we’ve explored every way LEDs and CFLs differ! This post is part of a series doing just that. So far we’ve covered everything from the basics, like rated-life and energy-efficiency to more complex topics, like how each source performs in cold temperatures. Click here to explore the entire series.

Radiation. We’re talking about lights here, so the topic was bound to come up sooner or later.

Infrared Radiation (IR)

First of all, it’s a myth that LEDs don’t generate heat. All light sources generate some heat, and LEDs are no exception. Excessive heat can damage an LED or lessen its rated life – so it’s essential that LEDs have well designed “heat sinks” to dissipate the heat generated in the rear of the LED.

This myth may have originated from the very true fact that LEDs don’t emit infrared radiation in the same direction as the emitted light, unlike other light sources.

A CFL, on the other hand, does emit IR and can get very hot to the touch. Continue reading »

Apr 162013
 

Directional LED Display Light 198x300 The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: Directionality
This post is part of a series exploring how LEDs and CFLs differ. Click here to browse the entire series.

LEDs and CFLs aren’t always suited for the same applications, because they emit light differently. LEDs are made to emit light in one general direction, while CFLs are omnidirectional, emitting light in all directions, just like incandescent light bulbs.

The LED’s directional light beam is very convenient for many applications because there’s little to no wasted light emitted away from the area you want to illuminate. However, this can get problematic when you replace an omnidirectional light source with a directional LED.

Directional LEDs are perfect for task lighting, display lighting, focused accent lighting, and even for use in recessed cans. Omnidirectional CFLs will work better for decorative lights, like table lamps, chandeliers, and ceiling fans, when you need even light coming from all sides of the light bulb.  Continue reading »

Apr 152013
 

How much energy can LEDs save?

If you often ponder the future of solid-state lighting, or you’re just a conscientious home or business owner, you’ll want to take a look at this report from the US Department of Energy on the energy-saving potential of the LED.

LEDs are one of the most efficient light sources around, producing the same amount of light as their incandescent counterparts using only a fraction of the power. The DOE expects great things for the future.

This infographic offers a rundown of just how much LEDs will affect our energy use in the years to come:

 Energy Savings Of Solid State Lighting (An Infographic)

Continue reading »

Apr 122013
 

Stock Photo Dimmer The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: Dimmability
LEDs
and CFLs. To the untrained eye, they might just seem like comparable alternatives to the incandescent light bulb. But when you dive a little deeper, you’ll find that they’re very different. That’s just what we’re doing in this blog series – you can view the whole series here.

Dimming. In a world where customization is king and energy-saving is of ever-increasing importance, dimming lets you have both. Putting your lights on dimmers saves electricity, using 10% less power when you dim the lights just 10%. (And more if you dim them lower.) Dimmers also let you tailor the lighting scheme to whatever you’re doing.

But, are LEDs and CFLs any good at dimming? Turns out there’s a bit of a discrepancy… Continue reading »

Apr 082013
 

LED 300x269 The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: Instant On
LEDs and CFLs are both popular energy-saving light bulbs. But, we consider CFLs the light source of the present and LEDs the light source of the future. In fact, we’ve devoted an entire blog series to explaining that concept, comparing everything from rated-lives, to how each light holds up in cold weather…

They say the good things in life are worth waiting for. But, that’s not the case when it comes to your light bulbs’ start time. When you flip a light switch, you want immediate results. If you’ve been using incandescent lights all these years, you’re probably used to that luxury.

So, you might not expect a CFL  (a light bulb more technologically advanced than an incandescent) to take longer to reach its complete light output. CFLs, even the best CFLs, can take anywhere from 1 to 60 seconds to reach their full brightness.

Why do CFLs have this delayed start?

Well, an incandescent light bulb produces light when an electrical current flows through its filament. The filament heats up and glows. CFLs, on the other hand, use a more complex system to produce light. Cathodes within the lamp heat up to about 900 degrees Fahrenheit and pass electrodes from one end of the lamp to another. This excites the mercury vapor inside the lamp, creating UV light. The UV light must then pass through the white coating on the inside of the glass envelope to produce visible light.

So, what about LEDs? Do they have a delayed start? Continue reading »

Apr 012013
 


LED Hanging The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: On/Off Cycling
Here’s another post in our series about the differences between LEDs and CFLs. So far we’ve covered everything from efficiency to safety. Click here to see the whole series.

Turns out, if you use CFLs and LEDs in the exact same way, they’ll react differently. Sometimes, the results can be damaging.

It’s a common myth that turning your fluorescent lights on and off frequently will increase your energy bill. While CFLs do use more energy to start up, it’s only equivalent to lighting the same lamp for a few extra seconds.

What you’ll need to watch out for is the price of replacing that CFL.

The rated life of a CFL, like all fluorescent lamps, can be dramatically reduced if the lamp is cycled on and off frequently.

The rated lives of LEDs, on the other hand, aren’t affected if you turn the lights on and off on a regular basis.   Continue reading »

Mar 292013
 

Kozzi snow machine trail 294x442 200x300 The Difference Between CFLs and LEDs: Low Temperature Tolerance
This post is part of a series written to help you understand the differences between the popular CFL (compact fluorescent lamp) and the newest kind of light bulb: the LED (light emitting diode). You can browse the entire series here.

Depending on where you plan to use your light bulb, you may need to consider how it will react to the space’s temperature.

For a chilly area, like outdoors in a cool climate or inside a refrigerator/freezer, an LED will work best for you.

LEDs love cold environments. In fact, using them in places with cooler temperatures may even make them last longer – beyond their standard rated lives. 

CFLs, on the other hand, require a lot of heat to initially turn on. When you operate them in below-freezing temperatures, you’ll have a hard time even getting them to start up.

So why do LEDs thrive in cooler temperatures? Continue reading »