Your Light Hacks for Easy Halloween Décor


Though probably the “darkest” holiday on our calendar, light is so very important to Halloween. The jack-o’ lantern (originally carved out of a turnip, by the way) only comes alive when illuminated. And when it’s close to midnight and something evil’s lurking in the dark, you need the moonlight to see that sight that almost stops your heart. (‘Cause this is thriller…)

Moving on.

If you’ve been bled dry of any creative Halloween décor ideas this October, consider using light to make a strong, spooky statement. Here are a few ideas:

1. Eyeballs on a string.

All you need for this project are some ping-pong balls, permanent markers, and Christmas lights. Just color in 2 concentric circles on the ping-pong ball in whatever colors you like. If you’re feeling especially ghoulish, you can draw red veins on them too, to make bloodshot eyes. Then poke a small hole in each ball and stick a single Christmas light through. You’ll have freaky glowing eyeballs to string across your doorway, or drape on a festive party table.

Image via LandeeSeeLandeeDo.com
Image via DollarStoreCrafts.com

2. Ghosts in the yard.

If you have handy lights lining a path or driveway at your house, this idea will take no time at all. You just need to collect a bunch of old plastic milk jugs with the tops cut off or white paper bags (I suggest making the decision after you get the weather report for All Hallows’ Eve). Simply draw eyes on the jugs/bags with a black marker, and slip them one by one over each path light. Bada-boo! You’ve got a yard full of phantoms. (more…)

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More Bling for Your Buck: How to Use Chandeliers at Home


Here at Pegasus, we recently added some brand new affordable chandeliers and pendant lights to our website. So, I think now is the perfect time to give you a few tips on how to use them. Read on for practical advice and some unexpected design inspiration for using chandeliers and hanging lights…

For the Dining Room:

I’m sure I only have to type the word “dining room” to make most everyone conjure up an image of a fancy table with an opulent chandelier. Though very little thought probably went into that association, adding a chandelier to your own dining room does take some planning. Two basic rules here:

1. A chandelier should always go about 30” above the table.

2. It should also be about 6” narrower than the width of the table on each side.

If you like the traditional look of a chandelier, but have a larger space to fill, try multiple fixtures instead of one large chandelier, which might look too bulky.

For the Living Room:

For those of you with a living room and dining room in one large space, or if your den has multiple seating areas, double chandeliers will also help the space look more cohesive.

For the Kitchen:

Even though it’s one of the more “functional” rooms in the home, a chandelier can add the perfect ambiance to your kitchen, making everyday tasks feel more fanciful.

While the 30” rule is a go-to for the dining room, a chandelier over an island or open counter top should rest slightly higher, as to not block your range of movement. (more…)

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Latest Trend: Industrial Lighting

The New York Institute of Art + Design recently published this mood board about industrial design on their blog:

Image via /blog.nyiad.edu

According to NYIAD, the industrial look features “unfinished woods, metals, and exposed structural work.”

What I love about industrial design is how lighting is so integral. Not only do the right fixtures (like the galactic chandelier shown above) add to the raw, material aesthetic, they also keep your bare-bones rooms from feeling too dismal.

Here are a few other “industrial” lights that will keep your home looking modern and mechanized, but never bleak. (more…)

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Energy Efficient Windows: Worth It In The Long Run?

Energy-efficient windows and doors

Energy-efficient lighting is always a big topic on our Light Reading blog. Today, thanks to Jim Klossner, a home and garden writer, we are able to put a focus on another big energy-efficient topic – windows and doors. There is some great information in this post about figuring out if it is time to upgrade your windows and doors and the options available. Enjoy!

When it comes to energy costs in the home, heating and cooling are a major factor. Many of the weakest points in your home’s fight for thermal efficiency are the windows and doors. This is especially true of older homes or those with large entryways and windows. Most retailers make it sound like the only fix for this is to buy the latest, greatest doors and windows. While newer energy efficient doors and windows can offer benefits in the right situations, are they truly worth the time and cost investment?

When to Consider Upgrading Existing Doors and Windows

The benefits offered by these upgrades are largely dependent on your existing windows and doors. One of the biggest factors to consider is the current configuration and the seal of the windows or doors in question. Single pane windows and metal doors offer little in terms of insulation and thermal resistance. They are especially prone to temperature changes due to wind. Combine this with aging seals, weak frames or shoddy installation and you have the perfect recipe for a drafty home and expensive energy bills.

Advantages of Energy Efficient Doors and Windows

Energy efficient doors are often made of materials such as fiberglass, vinyl or wood. These materials reduce the thermal conductivity of the door and help to maintain separate temperature zones on both sides of the door. High-quality seals and frames help to improve these characteristics by ensuring that your heater or air conditioner is not leaking its efforts into the surrounding area. This means easier regulation of temperatures during high or low periods and lower monthly energy bills. (more…)

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A Few Favorite Lighting Pins From Pinterest

I’ve been finding so many marvelous pins about lighting recently. In fact, I’m amazed it’s taken me this long to write a blog post about them! I’ve narrowed it down to my top 3…

This Foyer From Home Bunch:

Photo found on Pinterest via HomeBunch.com

I think we all know what I’m going to say about this one. The cove lighting and recessed accent lighting add so much, taking the room’s art deco décor to the next level. If I were to recreate this space, I’d definitely use LED tape lights. They’re incredibly low-profile and will stick anywhere I need them to go! (more…)

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Tips From The White House For Lighting Your Home

With the debate tonight and Election Day a month away, I’m in a presidential state of mind. No matter who we choose to run the country for the next 4 years, he’s going to live in a stunning, immaculately lit home.

While much of the White House décor would overpower a regular-sized home, we can take away concepts from its lighting scheme to make our own dwellings more beautiful. Here are a few universal lighting principles carried out Washington-style:

Layer those lights! See: The China Room

While I was scrolling through photos on WhiteHouse.gov, I noted that every room had two, three, four different light sources. For instance, in the China Room created by First Lady Edith Wilson in 1917, there’s not only a beautiful chandelier for overhead lighting, but there are also wall sconces and even display lights in the china cabinets. This adds visual interest, eliminates unflattering shadows, and creates striking focal points.

Photo via WhiteHouse.gov

Light layering is a flattering design strategy in any room in your house, but I chose The China Room so you could see how pretty it looks to have illuminated cabinets, hutches, shelves, and display cases. It might not be your first impulse to install a few linear or puck lights, but it’s really easy to do, and will make your cabinet’s contents and the entire room dazzle.

Know your color temperature. See: The State Dining Room

When we think of classic, traditional lighting, we often summon images of warm incandescent lights, as close to candle light as we can get. But, The State Dining Room shows us that cooler white light can be just as dignified. The daylight white light of the chandelier and sconces is unexpectedly cool, but it looks great! This color temperature is perfect to offset the clean white walls and crisp table cloths – a warmer light source may make things look too yellow.

Photo via WhiteHouse.gov

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