Oct 222012
 

Hanging Chandelier More Bling for Your Buck: How to Use Chandeliers at Home
Here at Pegasus, we recently added some brand new affordable chandeliers and pendant lights to our website. So, I think now is the perfect time to give you a few tips on how to use them. Read on for practical advice and some unexpected design inspiration for using chandeliers and hanging lights…

For the Dining Room:

I’m sure I only have to type the word “dining room” to make most everyone conjure up an image of a fancy table with an opulent chandelier. Though very little thought probably went into that association, adding a chandelier to your own dining room does take some planning. Two basic rules here:

1. A chandelier should always go about 30” above the table.

2. It should also be about 6” narrower than the width of the table on each side.

If you like the traditional look of a chandelier, but have a larger space to fill, try multiple fixtures instead of one large chandelier, which might look too bulky.

For the Living Room:

For those of you with a living room and dining room in one large space, or if your den has multiple seating areas, double chandeliers will also help the space look more cohesive.

For the Kitchen:

Even though it’s one of the more “functional” rooms in the home, a chandelier can add the perfect ambiance to your kitchen, making everyday tasks feel more fanciful.

While the 30” rule is a go-to for the dining room, a chandelier over an island or open counter top should rest slightly higher, as to not block your range of movement. Continue reading »

 Posted by on October 22, 2012 at 11:29 am
Oct 152012
 

The New York Institute of Art + Design recently published this mood board about industrial design on their blog:

Sheffield Mood Board Latest Trend: Industrial Lighting

Image via /blog.nyiad.edu

According to NYIAD, the industrial look features “unfinished woods, metals, and exposed structural work.”

What I love about industrial design is how lighting is so integral. Not only do the right fixtures (like the galactic chandelier shown above) add to the raw, material aesthetic, they also keep your bare-bones rooms from feeling too dismal.

Here are a few other “industrial” lights that will keep your home looking modern and mechanized, but never bleak. Continue reading »

 Posted by on October 15, 2012 at 12:27 pm
Oct 082012
 

 Energy Efficient Windows: Worth It In The Long Run?

Energy-efficient lighting is always a big topic on our Light Reading blog. Today, thanks to Jim Klossner, a home and garden writer, we are able to put a focus on another big energy-efficient topic – windows and doors. There is some great information in this post about figuring out if it is time to upgrade your windows and doors and the options available. Enjoy!

When it comes to energy costs in the home, heating and cooling are a major factor. Many of the weakest points in your home’s fight for thermal efficiency are the windows and doors. This is especially true of older homes or those with large entryways and windows. Most retailers make it sound like the only fix for this is to buy the latest, greatest doors and windows. While newer energy efficient doors and windows can offer benefits in the right situations, are they truly worth the time and cost investment?

When to Consider Upgrading Existing Doors and Windows

The benefits offered by these upgrades are largely dependent on your existing windows and doors. One of the biggest factors to consider is the current configuration and the seal of the windows or doors in question. Single pane windows and metal doors offer little in terms of insulation and thermal resistance. They are especially prone to temperature changes due to wind. Combine this with aging seals, weak frames or shoddy installation and you have the perfect recipe for a drafty home and expensive energy bills.

Advantages of Energy Efficient Doors and Windows

Energy efficient doors are often made of materials such as fiberglass, vinyl or wood. These materials reduce the thermal conductivity of the door and help to maintain separate temperature zones on both sides of the door. High-quality seals and frames help to improve these characteristics by ensuring that your heater or air conditioner is not leaking its efforts into the surrounding area. This means easier regulation of temperatures during high or low periods and lower monthly energy bills. Continue reading »

 Posted by on October 8, 2012 at 10:00 am
Oct 052012
 

I’ve been finding so many marvelous pins about lighting recently. In fact, I’m amazed it’s taken me this long to write a blog post about them! I’ve narrowed it down to my top 3…

This Foyer From Home Bunch:

Foyer Lighting A Few Favorite Lighting Pins From Pinterest

Photo found on Pinterest via HomeBunch.com

I think we all know what I’m going to say about this one. The cove lighting and recessed accent lighting add so much, taking the room’s art deco décor to the next level. If I were to recreate this space, I’d definitely use LED tape lights. They’re incredibly low-profile and will stick anywhere I need them to go! Continue reading »

 Posted by on October 5, 2012 at 11:11 am
Oct 032012
 

With the debate tonight and Election Day a month away, I’m in a presidential state of mind. No matter who we choose to run the country for the next 4 years, he’s going to live in a stunning, immaculately lit home.

While much of the White House décor would overpower a regular-sized home, we can take away concepts from its lighting scheme to make our own dwellings more beautiful. Here are a few universal lighting principles carried out Washington-style:

Layer those lights! See: The China Room

While I was scrolling through photos on WhiteHouse.gov, I noted that every room had two, three, four different light sources. For instance, in the China Room created by First Lady Edith Wilson in 1917, there’s not only a beautiful chandelier for overhead lighting, but there are also wall sconces and even display lights in the china cabinets. This adds visual interest, eliminates unflattering shadows, and creates striking focal points.

WH The China Room Tips From The White House For Lighting Your Home

Photo via WhiteHouse.gov

Light layering is a flattering design strategy in any room in your house, but I chose The China Room so you could see how pretty it looks to have illuminated cabinets, hutches, shelves, and display cases. It might not be your first impulse to install a few linear or puck lights, but it’s really easy to do, and will make your cabinet’s contents and the entire room dazzle.

Know your color temperature. See: The State Dining Room

When we think of classic, traditional lighting, we often summon images of warm incandescent lights, as close to candle light as we can get. But, The State Dining Room shows us that cooler white light can be just as dignified. The daylight white light of the chandelier and sconces is unexpectedly cool, but it looks great! This color temperature is perfect to offset the clean white walls and crisp table cloths – a warmer light source may make things look too yellow.

WH State Dining Room Tips From The White House For Lighting Your Home

Photo via WhiteHouse.gov

Continue reading »

Sep 142012
 

Have you seen Philips’ series of lighting makeovers? They’re all on YouTube, showing how LED lights can positively change the lives of people around the world. Seriously, LEDs can solve so many common lighting problems, it’s almost unbelievable! I’ve picked out my three favorites to share with you, featuring three unique problems and their ingenious LED solutions, but you can view all 20+ here.

This first LED makeover takes place in Amsterdam. A couple has been trying to sell their flat for over a year, and they haven’t gotten anyone to bite…

With inadequate lighting, real estate agents complain about low ceilings and a gloomy atmosphere. After the lighting makeover, the agents focus on the unique architectural features, the bright kitchen, and the cozy mood. And when post-lightover they price the flat at 40,000 euros more, it really makes you marvel at the power of LEDs! Continue reading »

 Posted by on September 14, 2012 at 1:33 pm
Jul 252012
 

bigstock 400px furnished sunroom with large w 18524357 All About Window Installation: What You Need to Know About New Windows
Ah…windows. Windows, obviously, are an important part of any home and provide valuable lighting during the day. Unfortunately, sometimes windows need to be replaced. I know firsthand because I have had to perform a window installation in my home before. This guest post comes to us from Mark Cunningham of Cunningham Contracting, a general contractor in the Silver Springs, Maryland area. Thanks Mark!

Are you thinking about new windows for your home?

If you are, then it helps to know all about window installation and what you get from it.

So let’s take a look at the reasons why you should get new windows, how to go about the process, and what you ultimately stand to gain once it’s all said and done.

Afterwards, you’ll be ready to get the kind of windows you want for your home.

Why Should I Get New Windows?

There are plenty of reasons why people get new windows, among them being: Continue reading »

 Posted by on July 25, 2012 at 10:00 am
Jul 112012
 

We, of course, love lighting. Layers of light help to brighten any space, highlight certain aspects of a room, and help set the mood. Justin Krutz, a blogger for Palatin Remodeling, sent us this guest post with interior design decorating tips to help you brighten your home beyond just lighting. Thanks Justin!

bigstock Modern Bedroom Interior 400pixels 300x225 Ways to Brighten Your Home Beyond LightingSo you’ve gotten that new lighting for your home and while it keeps you from sitting in the dark, the right lighting combined with the right decorative touches can do wonders for you and your home. It can bring new life to a room that’s been feeling tired for a while, help you get through the long winter days with little sun or even set the right tone for your home when the bright and warm summer days arrive once more.

Paint

Paint is widely recognized as a great yet inexpensive way to change up the look of any room, but a new coat of paint lends itself just as well to sparking new life in any area of your home.

White: White or variants such as off-white or cream are popularly known for making a room look larger. While white by itself may be a bit overpowering – it’s a great base to start with and you can mix it with other colors such as sky blues for the baseboards and molding

Earth Tones: Browns, beiges and similar earth tones are also a great choice especially when accentuated with darker shades or used to complement existing furnishings such as dark hardwood flooring.

Pastels: While reds, yellows and other colors may be too dark – you can still use pastel shades of these colors to help brighten up a room. Continue reading »

 Posted by on July 11, 2012 at 11:00 am
Jun 152012
 

NKBAKitchenPlannerCover Fantastic Kitchen Remodel Planning ResourcePoised for a kitchen remodel? Having trouble figuring out where to start? Get ready to be wowed.

I was perusing the National Kitchen & Bath Association website this week, and came across a section for homeowners called “Kitchen & Bath Planners.” Curious of what an official NKBA planning helper would look like, I downloaded a (free) copy of the 21-page guide for kitchens.

There are checklists, questionnaires, cost breakdowns, and tips galore. There are external links that delve into more detail about any question under the sun.

Did you know that you should expect to spend about 5% of your budget on lighting, 14% on appliances and ventilation, 10% on countertops, and 29% on cabinetry?

Have you thought about user-friendly considerations, like raising your dishwasher to a height that isn’t back-straining, or installing pullouts to make your cookware easily accessible?

Decided what kind of style/overall tone is right for you, and pinpointed clippings of kitchens that you love?

The Bath Planner is just as fantastic – and also free. NKBA, you outdid yourselves!

May 252012
 

bookcase lights 220x300 Use Bookshelf Lights to Help Tell Your StoryWhether they shelve books, artwork, or heirlooms, bookcases are a great way to feature your unique interests. However, it can be easy to let your special things fall into the shadows if they’re not properly lit. Here are a few different ways to spotlight your most precious items:

Strips and Microfluorescents

If you prefer to highlight your entire bookshelf, running a Xenon Low Voltage Light Strip or a microfluorescent light fixture along each shelf will do the trick. Just make sure you install the lights in a place they can’t be seen—that way they’ll draw attention to what is important and really make your display pop. As an added bonus, they’ll also provide a significant light source to the entire room.

Puck Lights and Recessed Lights

Do you have a favorite painting, sculpture, or photograph sitting on your bookcase? Feature it with a small puck light attached to the shelf above. This finishing touch draws attention to the item and adds diverse visual interest to the entire bookshelf. If your bookcases are freestanding and have curiosities on top, you can use recessed lighting to attract the eye above. Installing recessed lights is also an easy way to emphasize a bookshelf without illuminating the whole room, although this option will highlight the shelf more than its contents.

Need more ideas on how to display your favorite belongings? Check out these thoughtful shelf decorating tips by HGTV’s Leah Hennen!

 

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