Emily Widle

Emily Widle

Emily graduated from UNC Chapel Hill with a degree in journalism. She enjoys scouring the news to report on the latest in the lighting industry as well as bringing valuable remodeling tips and exemplar home projects to light.

Apr 042012
 

It can be difficult to visualize exactly how a display lighting fixture is going to look after installation. Unlike decorative pendants or elegant chandeliers, the focus is not the light fixture. In fact, you usually know a display light is doing its job if you hardly notice the light fixture at all! We have a wide variety of display lights – halogen, LED, flexible, battery-operated, and more. Admittedly, the product images we have are not too exciting. The shining moment for a display light, if you will, is after installation. Once they’re illuminating that exhibit or painting, you can see the point.

buffalo chip light1 Display Lights: From The Box To The Showroom Floor

 

 

 

This is our PAR Halogen Telescoping Display Light. We’ve heard back from customers who have used this for museum exhibits, trade show booths, retail displays, signs, wall hangings … the list goes on. One of our favorite applications for this light is depicted in the photo below. Held each year in South Dakota, the  Motorcycles As Art exhibit “captures the personal expression, creativity and spirit that permeate the history and culture of motorcycling.” Photographer Michael Lichter used this display light as gallery lighting for the exhibit.

Buffalo Chip display lights1 Display Lights: From The Box To The Showroom Floor Continue reading »

Mar 292012
 

GE Lighting’s Nela Park Campus in Cleveland, Ohio is celebrating its 100th anniversary in April 2013. To kick off the celebration, they unearthed a time capsule this week buried in the cornerstone of one of the original buildings. Inside were photos, journals, a local newspaper, and five incandescent light bulbs packed in sand that date back to 1912.

Can you believe that one of those light bulbs worked when engineers connected it to power? GE spokesman David Schellerman said he believed the light bulb was a 40-watt tungsten filament incandescent bulb; but that it will be cleaned and tested further.

Mar 262012
 

illuminated artwork How To Get The Most Out of the Artwork In Your HomeWant to call more attention to the beautiful artwork gracing the walls of your home? When it comes to enhancing textures, showing off detail, and making colors more vibrant, it’s all about getting the lighting right.

In general, you should light up artwork three times brighter than the rest of the room. It might be a good idea to put your artwork lighting on a dimmer so that you can install lamps with high lumen output and then tweak the light levels.

To avoid glare, place your picture lights or adjustable recessed trims at a 30 degree angle from the painting or photograph. For very large frames (such as the one in the photo above), increase the angle to about 35 degrees so that you won’t cast a shadow. For paintings with texture, decrease the angle to about 25 degrees to accentuate.

Typically, for smaller pieces of artwork, it’s best to install one light per frame. It creates a cohesive effect and ensures that each piece receives enough illumination. However, for a mural or piece of artwork that extends horizontally on the wall, you will probably want to install multiple lights. The general rule is to use one display light for every 2-3 feet of wall space.

You also have to take into account potential UV and heat damage from your lighting – particularly with oil paintings. To avoid UV damage, stick with LED lighting, which does not emit any ultraviolet or infrared radiation. To avoid heat damage, use the “hand test”  with picture lights – simply place your hand in between the artwork and the light fixture. If you can feel any heat, it may be damaging to an oil painting. Fluorescent and LED lights are both great options for minimal heat exposure. Halogen display lights tend to give off a great deal of heat.

Mar 222012
 

Wall Sconce How To Hang Wall Sconces

Wall sconces have the power to transform a gloomy hallway to a gorgeous corridor, making them a pretty popular light fixture. However, there’s a little less familiarity when it comes to knowing exactly where a wall sconce should be hung.

Wondering about how high the wall sconce should be hung from the floor – and how far apart multiple sconces should be placed from one another? You’ve come to the right place.

The beauty of a wall sconce is in the soft lighting that emanates from the shade and spills out from below onto the ground. The part of the wall sconce that is not too pretty is the view from above. You don’t want to see the top of the light fixture, with the light bulb screwed in – that would defeat the whole purpose of having a sconce!  So, when you determine the hanging height from the ground, measure so that the average person will still have the wall sconce in their natural line of sight, but will not be able to look down into the wall sconce from above.

Typically, contractors install wall sconces between 5.5 feet to 6 feet above floor level. However, if the average height of people living in your home is well above 6 feet – or below 5.5, you may want to adjust accordingly! If you choose a long or very large wall sconce, you may want to install them a bit higher up on the wall as well.

Now, for distance between light fixtures: If you are installing in a long hallway, space wall sconces about eight to ten feet apart. Other applications call for shorter spacing distances. For example, many people install wall sconces on either side of the vanity in the bathroom. In this type of functional use, spacing distance doesn’t matter as much.

Any more questions about wall sconces? Comment below!

Mar 222012
 

If I imagined lighting as a villain in a horror film, this would be it.

In all seriousness, this short film directed by David Parker is a project intended to bring awareness to energy waste. The “bleeding” lights metaphorically represent inefficiency.

The film was shot in Los Angeles and will be projected in selected US cities on vacant storefront windows and walls in alleys as public art. What do you think?

First spotted on JimonLight, originally found on Sunday Paper.

Mar 192012
 

Chances are, you have a few 60 watt frosted incandescent light bulbs in your home – they are very commonly used in table and floor lamps. Here’s the thing: There are other light bulbs out there that last longer, consume less energy, and provide up to 95% of the light output.

Plus, today’s standard 60 watt incandescent light bulbs will be phased out in the near future (January 1 2014, to be exact). We created an infographic laying out your options to replace that light bulb:

replacing that 60 watt light bulb How To Replace a 60W Incandescent Light Bulb: The Ultimate Guide

When you’re considering cost, take into account the expected lifetime! Paying $25.70 every 23 years for one LED A19 is less expensive than paying $3.25 each year for a Halogen A19. The total for that Halogen A19 light bulb (and all its replacements) adds up to roughly $74.75 over 23 years.

Want to embed this infographic on your own site or blog? Great! Here’s the embed code:

<img src=”http://images.pegasuslighting.com/infographics/replacing-that-60-watt-light-bulb.png” width=”750″ height=”1003″>
<br><br>
<a href=”http://www.pegasuslighting.com/replacing-60-watt-light-bulb.html”> Replacing That 60-Watt Light Bulb: A Cheat Sheet</a> created by <a href=”http://www.pegasuslighting.com”>Pegasus Lighting</a>.

Mar 132012
 

Jenna Spevack is an artist, designer, and environmental advocate in NYC. She recently designed a simple system for growing microgreens (i.e., arugula, mizuna, mustard, kale, etc.) in urban environments. Check out her video on Kickstarter below!

Jenna will have an exhibition on display at the Mixed Greens gallery in New York beginning May 3, displaying ordinary furniture objects that have been adapted into “microfarms.” Jenna’ s goal is to increase accessibility to healthy food – and to remove the cost barrier. The exhibition will demonstrate how anyone (even in the tiniest of spaces) can grow healthy, affordable food.

However, to fund her project, Jenna still needs a little over $1500. We donated microfluorescent T4 light fixtures as grow lights for her exhibition. Would you consider helping back her project? If you pledge at least $15, you will receive fresh microgreens – and if you pledge at least $100, you will receive a small sub-irrigated growing system!

Here is the link to more information on the project and how to contribute.

Mar 122012
 

Spring is oh-so-close, which means grilling season will be under way in no time! If you’re an outdoor grilling enthusiast,  you will love using one of these grill lights after sundown:

BBQ Grill Light Grill Lights: The Ultimate Accessory To Your BBQ Clamp lighting Grill Lights: The Ultimate Accessory To Your BBQ Xenon BBQ Light Grill Lights: The Ultimate Accessory To Your BBQ
Halogen lighting Grill Lights: The Ultimate Accessory To Your BBQ Portable lighting Grill Lights: The Ultimate Accessory To Your BBQ Halogen lighting1 Grill Lights: The Ultimate Accessory To Your BBQ

(from left to right; top row first): 1. Fixed Mount Xenon Grill Light 2. Clamp-On Xenon Bell-Shaped Grill Light 3. Clamp-On Xenon Grill Light 4. Clamp-On Halogen Grill Light 5. Portable Halogen Grill Light 6. Fixed Mount Halogen Grill Light

We have a more detailed post that walks you through choosing the right grill light for your backyard, but here are the basics:

  • Choose your light source. Halogen, xenon, and LED are all great options. Typically, halogen and xenon grill lights offer more light output than LED grill lights do. However, LED lights are the most efficient of the three, and they provide a longer lifetime than halogen or xenon.
  • Choose your mounting style. Clamp lights are attached to your grill with a 2-2.5 inch wide adjustable clamp. “Portable” grill lights are typically plug-in light fixtures with heavy bases that you simply place on your grill shelf. Fixed mount grill lights are the most seamless option, but they also require a bit more time for installation.
  • Choose your power source. Battery operated lighting is very convenient when it comes to grill lights – there’s no need to find a nearby outlet and certainly no need to call an electrician. However, if you want to avoid future battery replacements, go with either plug-in or hardwired light fixture. We do recommend having an electrician help if you opt for hardwired, since it needs to connect directly to electrical wire.

Be sure to comment below if you have any questions. Happy grilling!

Mar 072012
 
dimming tool Fun Tool: How Much Energy Can You Save?

Plug in the bulb type, hours used per day, wattage, and calculate your 5-year savings!

We are big fans of Lutron dimmers. The company – Lutron Electronics, Inc. – was founded over 50 years ago, so they have a lot of experience in the light control business. They are award-winning innovators. Plus, their products are just fantastic! The dimming controls are intuitive, the design is sleek, and the technology is sophisticated.

Not surprisingly, we sell a wide selection of Lutron dimmers.

I came across a fun tool this morning on Lutron’s website. It’s an Energy Saving Calculator allowing you to find out exactly how much electricity (and money) you can save in a particular room by adding a dimmer. You specify which dimmer you want to install, what type of light bulbs it will be used with, and how many hours per day you have the lights on.

Try it out for yourself! I plugged in the numbers for the light bulbs in my bathroom with a Maestro dimmer and found this:

Lutron Savings Calculator Fun Tool: How Much Energy Can You Save?

More than justifies the $35 cost of the Line Voltage Maestro Dimmer, doesn’t it?

Mar 052012
 

On the way out A Few Halogen Light Bulbs On The Way OutWhen the Department of Energy issued new energy efficiency standards in 2009, they didn’t just affect T12 fluorescent lamps. PAR 20, PAR 30, and PAR 38 halogen lamps will face the new standards as well. As a result, many inefficient halogen reflector lamps will no longer be manufactured or imported in the U.S. beginning July 14, 2012.

Of course, old lamps that don’t meet efficiency standards will still be available after July 14th until stock is sold out, just like with the T12 fluorescent lamp regulations.

For information on exactly which halogen light bulbs are on the way out, check out these very helpful brochures from Osram SylvaniaWestinghouse Lighting, and Philips Lighting respectively.

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