What is Under Counter Lighting?

LED Under Cabinet Lighting Vertical
Just in case you’re wondering, under cabinet lights are known by a whole bundle of different names. Besides the name “under cabinet lighting,” which makes a lot of sense because they’re the lights you install under your cabinets, they’re also called undermount lights, task lighting fixtures, kitchen under cabinet lights, and under cupboard lighting.

But, the name that has caused the most head-scratching here at Pegasus Lighting is “under counter lights.” Most everyone understands that under cabinet lighting and under counter lighting are different names for the same thing, but when you really think, it doesn’t make much sense.

Under counter lights are always installed over the counter, but they’re not called “over counter lights.” If I didn’t know better, I might picture small accent lights below the lip of a counter. Or even better, backlighting under translucent counters, making them glow. Though now that I think about it, that might actually be cool. Why don’t we call those under counter lights? (more…)

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The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: Directionality

Directional LED Display Light
This post is part of a series exploring how LEDs and CFLs differ. Click here to browse the entire series.

LEDs and CFLs aren’t always suited for the same applications, because they emit light differently. LEDs are made to emit light in one general direction, while CFLs are omnidirectional, emitting light in all directions, just like incandescent light bulbs.

The LED’s directional light beam is very convenient for many applications because there’s little to no wasted light emitted away from the area you want to illuminate. However, this can get problematic when you replace an omnidirectional light source with a directional LED.

Directional LEDs are perfect for task lighting, display lighting, focused accent lighting, and even for use in recessed cans. Omnidirectional CFLs will work better for decorative lights, like table lamps, chandeliers, and ceiling fans, when you need even light coming from all sides of the light bulb.  (more…)

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Energy Savings Of Solid-State Lighting (An Infographic)

How much energy can LEDs save?

If you often ponder the future of solid-state lighting, or you’re just a conscientious home or business owner, you’ll want to take a look at this report from the US Department of Energy on the energy-saving potential of the LED.

LEDs are one of the most efficient light sources around, producing the same amount of light as their incandescent counterparts using only a fraction of the power. The DOE expects great things for the future.

This infographic offers a rundown of just how much LEDs will affect our energy use in the years to come:

(more…)

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The Difference Between LEDs and CFLs: Dimmability

Stock-Photo-Dimmer
LEDs
and CFLs. To the untrained eye, they might just seem like comparable alternatives to the incandescent light bulb. But when you dive a little deeper, you’ll find that they’re very different. That’s just what we’re doing in this blog series – you can view the whole series here.

Dimming. In a world where customization is king and energy-saving is of ever-increasing importance, dimming lets you have both. Putting your lights on dimmers saves electricity, using 10% less power when you dim the lights just 10%. (And more if you dim them lower.) Dimmers also let you tailor the lighting scheme to whatever you’re doing.

But, are LEDs and CFLs any good at dimming? Turns out there’s a bit of a discrepancy… (more…)

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Bike Lights For Night Riding

Bike Lights Oval
My town is about as bike friendly as you can get. Most roads have designated bike lanes, or friendly “Share The Road” signs. All in all, bikers and motorists get along well here, but we’re not immune to accidents. Last week, I was driving in the evening and I saw a car accidentally force a cyclist off the road near a stoplight. He wasn’t hurt, but I could tell he was shaken. As an enthusiastic cyclist myself, that worried me. Did the car just not see him?

Whether you’re hopping on your bike to enjoy the spring weather, or to be a little more environmentally friendly, safety should be a priority.

The most important thing to consider when riding at night is how to see and be seen.

Here are a few of our favorite LED bike lights for night riding:

1. Clip On Bike Lights  

Clip On Light

These LED lights attach easily to the front and rear of your bike. The white light clips to the front break cables to help you see where you’re going, and signal to others that you’re heading their way. The red light clips to your seat rails, brightly marking your bike’s rear. They both operate in steady beam and continuous flash modes, visible from up to a mile away. They’re weather resistant and have a long battery life. (more…)

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How To Make Your Museum Lighting More Energy-Efficient

Bookshelf-lighting
We’re teaching how to go green and save energy with the lights in every space we can think of!

The right lighting is essential for any museum. Each exhibit needs a lighting scheme that will preserve the artistic, historical, or scientific integrity of the articles on display. And it just has to look good too.

If you’ve already landed on a lighting scheme that works for your museum, you’re probably apprehensive to change it, even if you could save money.

Good news: Upgrading your museum lighting is easier than you might think. There are a ton of small, barely noticeable changes you can make to your museum lighting that will save you energy. Also, newer energy-efficient lighting options may actually provide more versatile, higher quality light for your displays.

Let’s get started, shall we?

Small Changes:  

1. Guide Lights

If you have dark areas in your museum – night simulations or moody displays – you’ll always need small guide lights to keep your visitors safe and comfortable. These are things like step lights along staircases and rope lights along pathways or handrails. These lights will never add to or take away from the integrity of your display. They’re just there. So why not save a little energy with them?

The most energy-efficient step lights and guide lights you can find on the market are probably LEDs. They’ll last much longer than older incandescent lights and most fluorescent lights, and they’ll produce the same brightness while only using a fraction of the energy.

2. Exit Signs

Exit signs are necessary features in any museum, but it’s not necessary that you use a lot of energy to operate them. A good LED exit sign only costs $2 to operate every year. Compare that to the $39 it costs to run a single incandescent exit sign. The LED will pay for itself within a year!

If you’re even more ambitious about saving energy, you can opt for photoluminescent exit signs. They’re made with a special material that absorbs ambient light and emits it when the lights go dark. No maintenance or electricity required. (more…)

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