Sep 072012
 

Fluorescent Lamp T8 How To Cope When Your Favorite Light Bulb Gets The Shaft: Fluorescent Light Bulbs
This is the third installment of a three-part series on replacing EISA phased-out light bulbs – what’s leaving and why. You can read the first post on household A lamps here, and the second on reflector lamps here.  

Discontinued Fluorescents

T12 fluorescent light bulbs have been around since the ’30s, and in light bulb years, that’s just too plain old. Technology’s potential for efficiency, for saving you time and money, has moved light-years since then. That’s why the T12 phase-out began in July this year. This phase-out affected nearly all T12s, with the exception of the cold temperature lamps and a few others. Most T12s now have gone the way of typewriters and VCRs, cassette tapes and rotary phones – delightful relics, but come on people, we’re better than this.

We’ve also listed one T8 lamp with the group. While T8s are much newer, and most are much more efficient than T12s, the lamps listed are the oldest and most basic of their kind. They have the least lumens and the shortest lives of all the T8s, so while they’re cheap, they’re simply not a good value.

Here’s how to update:

Lamp

Date Discontinued

Good Replacements

Great Replacements

Slimline F96T12 60W

July 14, 2012

800 Series Slimline F96T8 59W

Coming Soon

High Output F96T12

July 14, 2012

800 Series High Output F96T8 86W

Coming Soon

Rapid Start F34T12

July 14, 2012

800 Series T8 32W

800 Series Energy Saving T8 25W and 28W

U-Bend FB34T12

July 14, 2012

800 Series U-Bend T8

800 Series Energy Savings U-Bend T8 25W

700 Series T8 32W

2014

800 Series T8 32W

800 Series Energy Saving T8 25W and 28W

You can still use these lamps, but they’re no longer imported or manufactured – once current supplies are depleted, they’re gone forever.

When building owners switch to current technology like newer T5s and T8s, they can save nearly 50% of the energy they normally use every year to power a T12. These new lamps are smaller in diameter, but can still provide the same light output, just like every other piece of new technology that performs better while having a sleeker, streamlined form.

by

Annie JoseyAnnie was the E-Commerce Marketing Specialist at Pegasus Lighting from June 2012 to October 2013. She has a background in English literature, and loves using language to help illuminate the world. So covering lighting news and tips naturally fit her interests. In her personal time she enjoys painting, biking, and reading.

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 Posted by on September 7, 2012 at 9:58 am

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