Mar 242015
 

Path Lighting Techniques that Break all the RulesIf you are a perfectionist when it comes to your yard, then what I’m about to say might make you a bit uncomfortable. For an alluring pathway that adds character and charm while gently guiding the way, you might have to break a few rules of symmetry and design.

Less is More

Pathway lighting is most successful when it’s soft and subtle. Just because your lighting kit included 12 path lights, doesn’t mean you need to use them all on your front sidewalk. Unless you plan on performing surgery in your front yard or garden – which we really hope isn’t the case – you don’t need tons of glaringly bright lights. DIY Network recommends that you think of your path lights as “gentle hints for where to go next, not outlining tools or runway lights for an airplane landing.” Try this test: On a clear night, with your outdoor path lights on, can you see the stars? If not, they may be too bright. Continue reading »

Mar 172015
 

Solar LED white washed metal lantern product spotlightThis year Pegasus Lighting added several new solar lights to our online store, and there are a handful that I’ve been ogling since the day they took residence on our site. In a strictly professional quest to gain a better understanding of our product offerings (wink, wink) I requested some products for thorough evaluation. The first item to take the spotlight: The Solar LED White Washed Metal Lantern:

Moonrays Solar LED lantern product image

The Moonrays Solar LED White Washed Metal Lantern

The Nitty Gritty:

  • The light is a little over 12” tall (about the size of a large shoebox) and has a metal white washed finish with opaque plastic lenses.
  • 2 Amber LEDs, powered by a solar panel and 1 AA NiCd rechargeable battery (included) provide 360 degrees of light.
  • Dusk to Dawn Operation turns the light off automatically when the sun comes up to save battery life.
  • $19.90 (price as of this blog post)

Continue reading »

Mar 102015
 

Trade show lighting strategies to draw a crowd
Are you attracting customers to your trade show exhibit with a killer lighting strategy?

There are plenty of ways to discourage people from approaching your trade show booth (overwhelming salespeople… underwhelming salespeople…annoying gimmicks) but how do you encourage people to come look at the product or company that you’ve worked so hard to build? When it’s you against hundreds of other companies that are all vying for attention, an eye-catching, interest-generating trade show booth has to have the right lighting strategy to draw a crowd.

Know your venue lighting situation in advance.

Having a head start on the lighting guidelines of your trade show venue is as important as knowing who your competition will be. Some convention centers have very strict regulations that will hamper even the most brilliant exhibit. The last thing you want to find out is that your track lights exceed height requirements or the wattage of your bulbs violate fire safety regulations, leaving your well-thought-out booth design fading into the background. Contact your venue ahead of time so that there aren’t any last-minute surprises.

Once you’ve got the logistics nailed down, you can start diving into the details of your lighting strategy.

Continue reading »

Mar 042015
 

A 5-Day Plan to Ease into Daylight Saving Time | Pegasus Lighting BlogIt seems odd to be “springing” forward when I’m still sloshing through the mud left behind by record winter snowstorms. This Sunday clocks adjust forward one hour for Daylight Saving Time, leaving many Monday morning commuters groggy, sleep-deprived and searching for the nearest java joint. If you’re usually one of those dazed drivers, there are some simple strategies that you can start implementing today that will leave you refreshed and alert when you hit the streets next week.

A 5-Day Plan to Ease into Daylight Saving Time
Sleep experts suggest that there are several ways you can combat the initial turmoil that losing an hour of sleep causes your internal clock. The key is having a plan and starting early. Continue reading »

Feb 252015
 

How to survive a snow day (in the South)In the Carolinas, snow days are a rare treat, but their scarcity means we aren’t always ready for what comes along with them. Hazardous driving conditions, icy steps, power outages and stir-crazy kids are par for the course. With a little planning, some creativity and a few affordable products, many winter weather woes can be alleviated.

Icy Steps & Sidewalks

I forgot how much my dog loves to frolic in snow. Which is why, when he lurched forward to run figure eights in the powdery stuff last week, his leash was still securely attached to my wrist and I was busy fiddling with the buttons on my coat. After a few terrifying seconds of skating across the thin layer of ice, I came to my senses and dropped the leash, skidding to a halt against a pine tree. Thankfully, the only thing wounded was my pride, but it could’ve been much worse. Continue reading »

Feb 212015
 

Recently I shared a blog post where I compared the voltage drop that causes dimming in a series of lights to a leaking garden hose. Today I’m sharing four tips on how to reduce or prevent this voltage drop in your electronic transformer so that the last bulb in your run of lights is just as bright as the first one. Here’s a simple rhyme to help you remember them: Short, Thick, Twist, Split.

1. Shorten the distance.
2. Use thick secondary wires.
3. Twist the secondary wires.
4. Split the output.


Interested in learning more about wiring low voltage lighting systems?

Feb 162015
 

Presidential guest room in the 1890'sIn 1891, electric lighting was still in its infancy. President Benjamin Harrison, the first president with electricity in the White House, was skeptical about its use. His story reads like the headline from a grocery store tabloid…

“President Benjamin Harrison Shocks America!”

“The Shocking Truth about Your President!”

“The Electrifying Fear that Plagued President Harrison”

Truth be told, the story about President Harrison’s fear of electric shock is a legend too, though not on the level of Bigfoot or the Lochness Monster. Continue reading »

Feb 102015
 

Understanding voltage drop, a garden hose analogy
Have you ever heard of the electricity/water analogy?

If wire is a water pipe and electricity is the water, voltage is the pressure of the water.

I’m a writer, not an engineer. So making sense of the technical aspects of light and energy is sometimes challenging. I need graphics and analogies to wrap my brain around them.

I’m working on some content about the very engaging topic of (dun-dun-dun) … voltage drop. Specifically, how to prevent it in low voltage lighting systems. Spoiler Alert! The voltage wins in the end.

Along the way I came across the water/electricity analogy. It made sense to me and allowed me to put voltage drop into a context that I could better understand and I thought it was worth sharing. Continue reading »

Feb 062015
 

February 14th, one day among 364 others that demands a little romance. In preparation for this amorous holiday, I present to you 11 tantalizing, captivating and love-inducing photos of delightfully lit spaces that virtually radiate with romantic appeal.

1. A Wedding at Dusk – Exposed antique light bulbs are a graceful touch above this wedding reception table. Vintage bulbs cast a beautiful, soft light without a harsh glare.

2. Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort, Finland  – It’s the romantic lighting double whammy. Lie in bed inside these softly lit glass igloos in Kakslauttanen, Finland while you gaze upon the most fascinating light exhibit on earth: the Aurora Borealis. Bam. Continue reading »

Feb 032015
 

The rule of 3’s. They’re the triple threat of lighting design. Three types of lighting: ambient, task and accent. Three levels of design: top, middle & bottom. For today’s blog post I’ve put together a quick reference guide on what the different layers are, along with a few tips on how to use them to pull your space together.

Three Layers of Light: Ambient, Task & Accent

Three layers of light1. Ambient lighting is used primarily for general vision. It is not directed at one particular item or area of the room, but instead uniformly brightens the space. An example would be an overhead dome light. Continue reading »

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